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环亚2020年04月28日19时32分41秒

时间:2020-06-07 17:16:12 作者:企鹅电竞 浏览量:42680

复制网址打开【AG88.SHOP】百度文库 xE0hXSsl“Time is running o/ut”, stres\sed Carolina Schmidt, Chi】l\e’s Environ【men\t and Climate Minister, /in a /】video 【ad\dress before 2019&】rsquo;s Cl】/imate Conference COP25 la\st Decembe【r. &ldqu【o;There can【n【ot be 】an effe/ctive】 global res\ponse/ to clima\te cha\nge withou\t a global response o】n\ ocean/ i/ssues,&rdquo/; she added.】 Ocean issues range widely, fr【om sea【-level rise a\nd lo【ss【【 of 】oxygen, to incr】eas/ed water temperatures and ch【anges thr/ou/ghout e】cosys【te】m【s. The Inte【rgovernmental 】Pane\l 】for /Cl/imate Chan【ge&rsquo/;s (IPCC) sp【ecial report on the s\tate// of the oc】ean\s f/eatures worrying future t\rends, while last 】year\, the heat in the oceans saw the highest value/ /ev】er recorded.Ocean aci】di【f\ica】tion 【u【ndermines the integrity of m【arine ecosystemsOcean a\cidifi【c】atio】n is the phenomenon in wh【ich o/ceans are becoming】 mo/re/ acidic, as they /conti【nu】e to a【bsorb more and 】more of carbo】/n in the atmosphere/, which is【 increasing due \to h】uman-produce】d emissions. In the】 last 200 years, about 30 percent【 of those\ total emissions have\ been gu】lped by\ the ocean, and 】today, sea wat/ers st\ill/ take in a【bout 25【 percent annually.Ocean acidification occurs when seawater rea【cts/ 】w】i【th the CO2 it ab【\sorb【s from t/he 】/atmosphe/【re, prod】ucing// 【more acidity-【inducin】g chemicals while redu【ci/ng important 】minerals - such as calcium c【\arbonate - that marine organisms rely on to /survive】.The oceans’ average s】urface ac/idity, ra【ther stable over millions of years, h\as increased by about 26 percent i】n the last 150 years. “It】 【was a very slow rise unt/il the 1950s, but】 from /then on\wards, acidif】icatio/n gained spee】d,&r】dquo【; sa\ys Dr. J【ean-Pierr/e Gat【/tu\so, researc】\h di】r\ector at the Laboratoire d'Oc&eacut\e;a【n/ographie de Villefranch】\e, CNRS and 【the】 Univ【ersity】】 of Sorbonne. “Since man-m】ade CO2\ emiss【/ions are【 the/ main cause of /\acidification, fut】ure proj】ections depend on their 】levels. In a bus/】【ines】s-】as-usual si】tuation, ocea【n acidification c】ould /i/ncrease by anoth】【er 150 percent by 】2100,” a\dds\/ \Dr. Gattuso.With 9 perc/ent of th】e ne\ar-surface ocean affe】cted by fa】lling p】H, aci\】dification eff】e\cts are incre/asing】ly felt globally,】 across【 a wide range of marine \ec】osystems. “The worl\/d seems to be/ ob【\sessing ab【out what is happening on land【【 and in the atmosphere, no【t realis【ing that li\fe on Ea/rth is wholly a 【s】ubsid】ia/ry of t】/he ocean, that 【a【ccounts for 98 【pe】rcent o/f species on the planet,” says Dr. 】Dan 【Laffoley, M/arine【 Vi/c\/e 【Chair 【on IU【CN&【rsquo;s Wor【ld/ Commission o/n Protecte【d Areas and【 Senior Advisor \Marine Science and Conse\rvation 【for its Global】 Marine and Polar Progr\amme. &ld【quo;What was/ predict\e】d [about acidification] back i\n 2004 as\ something we needed n【ot\ to w\orry abo\u/t until 2050 or 207Text sizeAaAa“Every】 time I \have a bath, st】ill now, I say 【than/k you. I sti【ll feel the gratit/ude. Every morning when I wake up and can make/ a cup of tea without building a fi/re, I think ‘god that’s so amazing I ca\n do that.’”I was t\hrille/d when Alex Fisher agreed to meet 【me, k【een to tell a s【tory that has been \【【overloo】ked in the last 25 years - forgotten as a new wave of climate ac【tion sets in. Alex was an env【【iron\m】enta【【l campaig/\ner for se】veral ye\ars in t】he 1990s,\ st\and\ing up for th】e tr【ees w】hen【 go【\vernment scheme/s 】thre\a【tened to\ cut /them down\. For a whole yea【r, she liv/ed outside i】n t【he /fo】rest, often/ /h】igh up in treeh/ouses or &lsq/uo;twiglo\o/s’, abse【iling d】own tree trunks in th【e morning for b】reakfast.\ Magical as it may sou】nd, the realit/y was far from the【 Enchante】d Wood in the 】Enid Blyton se\ries, a/ childho/\】od fav【o【urite of /my intervi【ewee. \For c】ampai【gners like Alex,【 it was a v【eheme【nt form of activism ag\ainst politically mo\tivated deforestation, enforced by【 /law in a bid to build mo/re\ /road【s.&l【dq/uo;&po/und;20 b\illion w【\as the budget&r【dq/\uo;/, s【he recalls. &ldq/uo;They called it the bigg\est road building s/cheme since the Romans.”\/ 【\For the 【activists, the p】roble/m wasn&rsq【/uo;t only the size of the project, but/ the places they had \chosen to bui\ld 】/th【e ro/ads. Alex/ speaks n】ostalgically \of whole /landsca】pes that were destro【yed, 500-year-】old trees】, bluebell forests, wat【/e【rfalls a【nd SS】SIs【 (specia/l si】tes of sc/i【【entific /interest) which served【 】as vital animal habi】tats. “An/ oak tre】e suppo】r/ts hundre】ds of different /species”, she te】lls me\, adding/, “】w/hen you cu\t one【 down, that’【s 500 years】 of gr【owth undone /then a】nd/ 【there.】 I】 pl】anted 10 sapli】ngs from an/ o\ak tree 25 years ago, but \they are/n’t eve\n \/old enough yet /to make a【co【rns &nda\sh; it/ takes【 】30 years.&rdq/uo;Alex's ne/wspape\r clippings from her scrapbook, char\ting 【he/r time at the road protests c】amps\Euronews LivingFrom fashion t】o the f/or\e】stFor\ \Alex, a d/】eep love and r】esp【ect f\//or nature de】veloped\ e】arl【\y on. 【G【r/owi\/ng up on the /outskirts of Brighton, she spent mos】t of her childh\ood cycling in th】e countrysi【\de and 】playin/g in her very own】 treehous】e at the end /of \the garden. As【 a young ad/ult, she moved to Lo/n/don in s/earch \of a career in fashion jo/urnalism, swap】pi】ng her/ rural roo/ts for t/he bright lights of the city.Sh\e ended up 【working 【at Vogue and, wh【】ile \her time th【ere was “unb/elievabl】y excitin【g”, sh】e soon realised that the fashion industry simply existe】d/ to\ \pr】omote what she calls &ldq【【uo;obsolete consumeri/sm.”\ “It wasn’t abou】t// caring”, she /tells m【e, “they may have seasons in 【fashion - //bu】t they take tha】t from n/ature.” What’s in for Au】tumn is out by Sp】ri/ng,【 encouraging a constant loop o\f disposal materi/alism t/hat is pol】luting the earth.&ldqu\o;I【 took som\/e t\ime out after starting my c\are\er t\o 】think about what I car/ed about m/ost.【 We were on course to destruct the planet and when I hear/d about the road p【rotest movement,/ I kne/w\ I\ had to go and take part/ &nd【ash; it wasn&rsq/uo;t /enough【 ju/st t【o talk about it. I needed to act, and I was willing to risk my life in the process.”Ale】\x\ Fish\e【rEu】ronews Living/Leaving London with a friend,】 Alex/ se】t up camp for the yea\r at the Fair】mi【le prot【est s/ite in Devon\. She \speaks fondly of\ how quickly she/ adap\ted to living /outsid】e. &l\dqu/】o;I \r】em\e/mber w\aking up in the morning, making the fir】e】 】and get everyon\e \&ls【quo;breakfast\ed’.&r/\dquo; She【 des】cribes the resourceful ways they\ woul/d\ have\ to【 adapt to w/eather【\ conditio\ns like snow. What】 daily li\fe wa\s like living outside“\Often the】 water butt w【oul】d h\ave frozen overnight a\nd I w\ould literally have to 】gat\her up the snow and melt it to try and m/a\ke people a cup of t】ea.” E【【veryday tas【ks involved cooking communa【l fo/od, “which was always vegan, because tha】t covers everyone”,/ choppi【ng /wood f/or t\he communal fire pit and carrying\ water.&ldquo】;We al/l lived in d/ome-sh/aped b【enders in【 the tree【s,【 made from】 will】ow poles. 【You connecte【d the branches to a platf\o/】rm underneath, and cov【ered it wit】/h waterproof tarp\aulins and blankets from】 the\ recycling centre.” Curious, I ask how 】they【 managed to stay wa【rm, especially【 at ni【ght d/uring the/ win\t/【er months. “Pretty much everyone/ wore ski/】 salopett】es】 th/ey picked up 【from s\ec】ond-】hand shops 】and got used to 【wear】in【g】. And /of course we m/ade wo/od stoves in every bender to huddle/ round - I remembe】【r sitting there in/ just a t-shirt in】 】Dec\ember in【side a treehouse!”T\he 【ha】rsh 【realityBu【t it wasn’t always so tw】ee. The politic【al nat】ure of\ the movement mea】nt that brutal e\victions were the norm w/h【en camping out in certain/ a\reas. 】With t/he same ra【ge she must have felt at the t/ime,\ Alex paints me a p】icture \【o【f\】 the hundreds of security gu【ards, police】 and bailiffs o】n the scene - hir】e】d to 】extract【】【 the ca/mpaigners fro】m t】he trees. &】ld/q\uo;Ther\e w【ere thr】eats o/f sex【ual violence by【 the ma】le/ sec】ur】i\ty, we were fire bombed, it wa\s extremely dangerous”, she re/collects.&ld】quo;】The security guards se\em\ed【 complet【ely unregu【lat\ed. T/【hey were employed by the road \building con\【tr\actors to cu【t us out of trees using【 big cranes called cherry-pickers. At】 one evictio/【n, I was 【str】appe\d to a tree with a 【harness on, when a pr】ofessional climber cut my s\afety line and came a】/n】d grabbed me. I was scared for my life.”\ Photos of the evi【ctions from 】A【le/【x's scr/apbookEuronews LivingThat t】ime she was arreste【d, /she a/dmits. Taken to the police s/ta/tion with purple/ bruises /up h】/er arm from the quick cuffs, she w【as /【photogra】phed and fi\ngerprinted befo\re being let go with a warning. In many ways, Ale/x rec【all】s she was one of the l【ucky \ones. “I \remem/be/r one person fell 】out of a tree a【/n】d ended up i【n a wheelchai\r.&rdquo/; She de/】sc【ribes the end/uring t\rauma from that period in /t/he】ir live【s, t【he so【un\d of chainsa【ws haunting them for years after the\ \pro\test e【nded. The frustration an\d anger behind \it a\ll, the shee/r horror of decimating the landscape kept 】the campaigner】s 】going every day, Alex exp【l/】【ains. &】l【dquo;Bu/ilding mor【e roads seemed a strang【e policy to adopt when the en\vironmental issues were s/\o well known&rdquo】;, she says. &/ldquo;They should have been 【【investing in the railways and in c/yclin\g rout【es./ T【here seemed complete disregard for any】where th\at was environmentally\ protected【.&r\dquo;The magic of th/e tre\esNonethele【s】s, a【 profou【nd sense of 【community\ and joy appeared to enc【o】/mpa】ss the 】m\ovement】 wherever 【sh\e went. “There was so muc\h\ beauty a/nd joy, it was the s】ubtle th【【ings”, Alex la/ments. //“W/【hen you are in the forest twenty-f】/our hours a day, there【 are cert】ain \things you can’【t experience anywhe】/re else. Like how the l】ight 】changes at 6 o【’clo/ck i\n the 】/morning,【 【th】e sou】n\ds of 【t/he rain on the tarpaul\in,\】 an【d wak/ing up to t/he da\wn c【horu\s.&rdquo】/;Sp】en/ding /much of /her ti/me swimmin/g and washing \in the rivers, she r【e/members that magical feelin】g wh【en, “a/ll of a /sudden, a flock o/f swans w】/o/uld just/ glide past/ 】you.” 】T【hose e【xperiences stay with h】/er t【oday as “beautiful moments where you\ just f】elt it 【was 】such a gif/t to/ be alive.”Photos of the \trees fr\o/m Alex'\s scrapbookEuronews Livin】gSpeaking】 to this \brave, humb】le woman, who ha】s never expected any recog】nition for the f/ight she foug【ht in defence of our trees, I get the 】impress\/ion that i\t wa【s an immense//ly positive time in her lif/e. Yes, th【\e brutality o【f 【the evi】ctions was traumatic, but the 【sense of\ sol【idarity p/erv】ading the movement /see【m/ed more powerf【】ul【\. The simp【l/e pleasur\es of/ cooking aro】un/d a fire every night /and the variety of roles th】e com/munity/ would play 】i】n /sustaining the camps. 】I ask h】er \wha/t she means by /this, a【nd she explains h\ow yo】u di】【dn’t ha】ve 】to be/ living outsid【e to /be part o】f the m【o】vemen】t.&ldquo】;At one of the most 【high-profile ca\mps in】 Ne/w【bur【y, e】veryda/y\ peop/le wo【uld/ come o/ut of t【heir hous【es and sa/y - 【who wan【ts a bath? Y\ou would see 70 campaigner【s graciously accep\ting, queuing up【 ou【tsid】e someone&rs】quo;s house【 to /ha/v【e a bath.【”】/ It was /the gener【osity of /the/ community /that allowed them to c\ontinue/, Alex says, and food【 /and 【clothing dona【tions from individuals /that qui】te 】litera\ll】y sustained t】he camps for a number of yea\rs.How does climate action compare today?In the en/d【,/ the road protest move/ment didn’t st\op the\ whole network from being /built, but nume】rous roads and bypasses were cance【lled at the end of 1996. Ac\t\ivists d/id man/age to save a】 l】o/t of 【landscape, \which “fee【ls like a succes/s&rdq】u】o;】【, Alex/ recalls\ /with a sad smile. “【We increa\sed awareness. At l】east 【politi\cians give lip s\ervice/ to\ envir【onmental issu\es n】owa】d/ays. They \didn’t even spea\k a\b【out it back\ t【he【n, and 】I’d like to【 think】 we had someth】ing to do with that shi\ft i/n cons\cious【ness.&r/d】quo;A shot of】 】the treehouse f】rom the/ ground at【 the protes\t campEuronews LivingWhen I \bring h【er b/ack to 】the present mom/ent and ask what she thinks【 abo/ut 【t】【he cl】imate moveme】nt t】oday, she seem【s frustrated. &ldq/uo;It&】/rsquo;s sad because everything has got so/ mu】ch worse than it\ wa【s 25 years ago, t【he gla】ciers ar】e melt【ing faster\ than ever, we’ve al/ready lost so mu】】ch 】w\ildlife.”I c\an sense】 the\ act\ivist is still alive and we/】ll in/ Alex, despite her more conventional li/festyle nowaday】/s, as an/ editor of a magazin【e】, /liv【in\g in \a house i】n Sussex with 】her son. \But all hope\ is not l】ost. &l】dquo;Greta Thunberg ha【s been /】/an amazi【ng ca/taly/st for 【the yo/ung【e】r generation”, she says. “The situa】t】【ion\ may be/ worse】 but the awarenes】s has broaden【ed. Ext/inction R\ebe】llion ha/ve mobili/sed so many people &ndash】; back then\ we wer/e called ‘crusties’, treated as ma\d\】 members\ of/ society 】an【d ost】racised.”While those o【ver the a\ge of forty wi/\ll likely remember the】】 efforts of the ro\ad p【rotest m【ovement in 90s Britain, millennials are none the wiser. I am grateful 】to have【 met Alex and to share her 【story, as grassroots climate 】act/ivism【 takes hold /of society once】 again in 2019. A 】&】】ldquo;second wav【\e”, A】lex sugges】ts. Ha\vi\ng learnt how to be s/elf\-suffici【en\t, \she&r/squo;ll never take 【for gran\ted the re\sources /that nature can provide a【nd /often longs for the days w\h【en she relied】 on the si\mple warmth of an open fire.【Share t】his article 】 / More from places 【is happening now.&rdqu】/o;Cutti/ng /the water&/rsquo;s amount of carbo/nate i【ons】 robs a w【ide range of /mari】ne animals of the vita】l material t/hey n/eed t】o 【build protective shells. Mussels, pla\nkton, or\ reef \c】or】als are /some o】f the main sp\ecie/s u【/nder】 threat, multiple s【tudies show./Tropical 【coral reef\ ecosy】stems oc/cupy less t】han\ 0.1 per【ce/nt\ of the o【cea【n floor, but between on\e and/】 9 millio/n species live in and around them. As scientist/s p/\redict 】that calcium car\bonate 】】will drop by the end of【 t/h/e cen【tury, halv【ing its pre-industria\l con/centration across the tropics, /scientists a】re wo】rried that 【corals m\igh【t switch from building to dissol\vi/ng mode. While they might not shr】ink, oc/ea【n ac】idification a】lone 【might lower 】the densit【y of their s\kel】etons, by as much a\s 20 percent by 20. Aci/dific【ati】on weakens/ reef\s facing furth\er /p\ressures from b\leaching-\inducing heatwaves, \as well as economic act】iv/ities\. “We are/ w\eake】ning their repair mechanisms,&rdquo】; says】 D/r. Laff【ol\】e/y. \In【 the ne/xt 20 years, scientists s\ay that】 coral reefs /are lik【ely to degrade f】ast, chall\/enging the l\ivel/iho\o\ds of 0 million people depending \on th】em for food, coastal prote\ction and income.Acidification al/s【o affects deep-water corals\ – such 【as those in the North Atlantic &ndas】h; whi【ch are biodiversity hotspots, critical hab\itats for thou】sands of species,\ \including commercial ones, s】u\ch as shrimps, lobsters, cr\abs, groupers,/ and snappers. “Their skeletons are being eroded /in】】 the same manner as o\steop】or/os\is is weakeni【ng ou/r b\ones/【,” says Dr. Laffoley.A phe】nom/enon not yet\ \fully under】stoo\d\“There are observations of ho\w ocean acidificat【ion【 im\p/ac/ts certai/n species,\】” says/ Dr【. Helen Fi【/ndlay, biol【ogical o【ceanographer at the【 Plymouth Marine La【boratory (PML),\ which uses Copernicus Climate Cha【nge Servi【ce (C3S) data and 【infras\tru/cture to estim】ate the \ocean\】’s pa/st and fut\ure aci【d【ity. These impacts are m\ore often 【asso\ciated with ocean regions where 【deep waters &ndas】h; which 】naturally t/end to be more acidic &nda/sh; r/is/e to the surfac/e, boosting acidificati【on regionally, explains Dr./ \】F【i/ndlay. For instance, acidic w【at/ers d\ama\ge o【r d】【isso/lve the shells\ of plankt/onic 【sea snails, important feed for fish such as salmon.But /【s\tudies have show\n spec/ies can respond in mixed w】ays. Some might benefit from acidification, as well as f【rom ocean 】warming, and /inc【reasingly p/redate other sp【ecies,\ IP\CC experts cla/im. Across ecosystems, microscopic marine algae – 【or ph\ytoplankt/on, the b/asic feed /o】f many 【marine food webs/ &ndash】;【 【m/ig】\h】t suf\fer or flo】urish in more 【acidic seawater. Satellite 【data on ocean co【l【o】ur from the Copernicus Marine Se【rv【ice can provide【\ a closer look a\t the oc\ea/n&】rsquo;s 】C/O】2 uptake and how the marine food】 chain mig/h\t react.“Th】e Copernicus Cli/ma【te/ /Change (C3S) Marine, Coastal a/n/d Fisher】ies (MCF【) Sectorial Information System (SIS) project has【】 produced\ a series o】f marine envir】o\n】ment clim\/ate imp/\act/ indicators\, including several \re/lev\an【t to ocean ac\idification, a【long with a number of too【ls that demo【nstr/ate how th\e indicators can be used in marine applications,&rdq【uo; 】says Dr. James Clark, s】enior scientist at】 PML/【. “A majo【r goal of the project is /to produce a 【set of products that su\ppo\rt Eu\ropean climate change【【 adaptation str\ategie】s and mitigati【【on policies. Indica【tors from the CS-MCF project are being incorporated in【to the C】3S /C】limate Data【 S】tore, and a】re expected to 】g【o /live in the next few wee】ks.&】r【dq/uo;/Impac\ts on /biod/iversityEffects of the 】same】 phenomenon may take different faces across r【egion【s/. Throu/g【/h the mid-2000s, the U.S.&】r【squo;s Pacific Northwest began seeing dramatic】 oyster d/ie-o/f】fs in【 hatcheri【es, as th【\e larvae were affec】te【d by acid/】ifie【【d waters; the vital 【coastal shellfish/ industry was h/i/t\ 】hard. In Canada, scientists e/xpe】ct acidification\ on the Pacific c【oast to 】/give way to increasingly toxic algae】, compromisi\ng shel【lfish, and a】ffect\ing even fish, seabirds and marin【e mammals. 】They also anticip\ate one species of fish-killing a/lgae might wi/n more territo/ry in mo/re】 acidi\c wate/rs, threatening loc【al salmon aquaculture】.In Eur】ope, big mollusc producers】 on the A【tlantic 】】coasts】/ like Fran/ce, Italy, Spain, and the UK are 】expected t/\o 】suffer the most【 from acid】ifica】tion impacts by the 】end】 of t\he century. Data from \t\he Co【pern/icus Marine Se/\rvice, which recently includ\【ed sea】water】 pH am】【o\ng its】 ocean m/onit/ori\ng indicators】, is/ used】 by res【/ear\chers【 to gain a better under\stan/ding 】of how acidifi】cation evo【lves in 】European waters./Acidification effects in/ the A【r】ctic also worry scientists, some predicting that its \【waters wil\l lose its /shell-building ch\em】\icals by t】he 20/80s. Still, there are o】nly spotty measurements of oce】an【 acidification i】n the A\rctic, points o\ut Dr. Gattuso, due to its hars\】h rese/ar\ch condit/io【ns. \&/ldquo;W\/hat we do know】 is that /Ar【ctic wate/rs are natu\/rall/y mo【re【 a【/cidic – as CO2, li/ke \all gases, dissolves much faster in cold \water. We worry【 that in about 10 percen/t of the\/ A【/rctic’s o/cean s】urface, the 】pH is so low tha/t the \water is b】ecoming corrosive to organisms/ with shells,” says D/r. Gatt\us【o.Changes 【in ocean physics\ and chemistry a\nd impacts o】n organisms and ec/osystem service\】s according to /str/ingent 【(R【CP2.6/)/ an\d/ high bu【sines】s-as-usual 】(RC【/P8.5) CO2 emissions scena】rios.Source: Scie/nce Mag】 “The prob\lem【 is we are really asking for trouble by changing\ t\】he fu】nction\ality of the ocean,&r】dquo; says Dr. Laffoley, who highlights that 【th】e mix of acidificatio\n,\ ocean wa/r/ming an】d lo/ss o】f /oxyge【/n i\n the water】 is weake【ni】ng t【he overall system, with poorly u】nder【sto】od consequences. “The scale and the /amount【 of carbon a\nd h】eat going into the\ ocean is j】ust truly j】aw-dropp/ing. It&rsqu/o;s a\ proble【m that we 【are】 rather storing up than r】esolving it./” Reversing acidif】ication i/mpac/ts on ecosyst/ems?【“We have already\ commit】ted 【to ocea】n a【/c】idif\ication to its current levels and beyond【, through the amounts of】 CO2 emi/\tted,\” says Dr. 】Fin/dl】ay.】 &ldqu】o;T\he onl\y certain approach is mitigatin\g CO2 e【missions,\&rd【qu】o; say】s Dr. Gattuso. “It w\ill take\ a long time to go back to【 the preindustri\al stat/e, but we can /stop oce【an acidification./”Scie【【nce\ i【s exploring solut【【i【ons, but their 【effects on\ e【cosyst\ems and oce\an pr\oce\sses are not yet fully unders\tood. \Some oc\ean-based 【climate change fixes don/&rsq\uo;t t/arget directly oc\ean acidifi【】cation, while】 others might not be very efficient at\ lockin/g away the carbon. However, 【“more researc】h is being done 】to investiga\te ho】w 】we can use macro\algae, sea-grass b】eds, man】gr/oves, et】\c to st【/ore c】arb】on and also to lo【cally/ ease ocea\n acidi【fica/tion,” says Dr. Findlay\.Adapting fisheries to ease t/he pr【e/ssures o/n ecosystems 【may also provide a way to live with ocean acidification. For\ exampl【【e, 】C3S and PML are com\【】bining wh【at mod\el【s/ say abou【t potential ef\fects of 】c】【limate change on Europe/an s【eas with 】speci/es inf\ormation /to f\oresee how fish s/\toc】ks mig】ht /change/ and【/ how ind/【ustri\es and people depending\ on fisheri】es need to ada】pt./ /“The C3S data will】 be/ used to identify /areas of opportunity【, such as】【 increases in number\s of some fish species\, a【s we/ll as risks, such as dec/lining fish stocks\,&\rd】quo; says Dr. Clark.\ &】ldquo;As/ a\ \result, the sector will be able to mitigate the effects of climate change 【by p/lan【ning sustainable fi/shing practices./&/】rd【quo;Identifying which pa/rts o】f the【 oce】an need u【rgent conserv】ation cou\ld】 al【so help ecosystems mit】igate aci【dification. Experts have been map/ping c/ritical marine ecos】ystems to spot\ where protected\ areas should be /created or \exte\n/ded. &l/dquo;We can h/ave /places【 【where we take th】at\ pressure off, so we give/ areas of the oceans the be【st\ h】ope 【of ri\din【\g\ out the cha【llen\ges that they face \while we go ab/out reducing CO2 emissions,” s【ays \D】【r. La\ffoley.Share this /articleShareTw\/ee/tShares\endSha/reTweetShar/esendMore/Hide\ShareSendSh】areShare】ShareSendShareSha/reMo】re aboutGloba】l 【warming and climate\ changeOceanEcosystemEnvironmental prot\ecti/onP\artne【r: Copernicus 【 【\ Most 】viewed \ / / / What】 influence on climat【e// is the coronav\ir\us lockdow\n really havin】g? 】 \ The n\】\ew 【【AI system safeguarding prem】ature\ \ba/bies from infection 【 / 】 / 】 \ Messenger RN【A: the mo【lecule that may teach ou【r bodies to b】eat canc\er \ \A/p【ple and Google say/ they'll 】work tog【ether to t\race spread of coronavirus via smart/p】hones \ 】 【 \ How EU funding is chang【ing \the face o】f Latvian innovation \ Browse toda\y�【39;s/ tagsuc8d

nDSrThe cement industry is r\esponsible for between 6 to 8 per \cent of global carbon【【 di【oxid\e emissions.Re\searchers looking 】into how to impro【ve the situation h【ave designe】d 】and built【【\】 an experime】】nt//al plant at a cement fact【ory in Belgi\um to try to \find soluti【ons.The factory, whi【ch covers around 70 hectare【s and employs 】around 1 workers, produces an estimated 1.4 million tonnes of 1/】 /di【fferent varieties of cemen/t from a common r】aw material: /limestone.But【 this 】comes wit/h an en】vironmental cost:/"I/f 【we produce one tonne of cement, we generate 0.6\ tonnes of carbon dioxide/. \This carbon 【dioxide main【ly c\omes from】 our raw m】ater【ial】s," s/ays Ja\n 】Theulen, direct/】or of】 al】ternative resource】s at \Heidelberg 】cement.Therefo/re, we need\ to de/velop】 te\chnologies to capture this c\arbon dioxide so that it is not e【mitted to the env/\ir【onment."The factory \has teamed up 【】with rese【archers from the Europea/【n research project, Leilac (\Low Emissions Intensity Lim】e And Cement)】 to search【 for such 】technolog/\ie\s.The outcome is a 6【0-meter/ high plant wit】h a pi【lot reactor th】at&\acute;'s alre\ady able to a/bsor【\【b 5 per c】ent of t】he f\actory&\acu】】te【;s total carbon dioxide emissi】ons\."【Ther\e is a big metal tube/ that´s heat\ed on t/he\ outside 【at /around【 a 1,000 deg】rees.\ The raw material is dropped in the top an\d it falls slowly d/own/. As this mate】rial】 gets heated,】/ it r/ele/ases its carbon d/ioxide. A\n【d th】is pure carbon dioxide c【an sim/ply be captured a【t the to/p," e】xpla\】in】s Leilac project coordin】ator, Daniel Rennie.Researche/rs say the tech】nology \requires 【minimal /chan【ges i【n the factory】&acut\e;s \con/ventional chain of 】cement production, \enabling the capture 】of ca\rbon dioxid【e with/o\ut additional chemicals.Bu/t there are stil】/l differ/ent【 challenges】 th\at need to be addressed."The materi】al /has to be【 able to flow 】do\wn the re】actor. It f】lows down the\ rea/ctor/, b】ut】/ then at the bottom, it n\eeds/ to be co/nveyed \i/n】to the o【th】er units /on sit\e," sa】y/s T/homas Hills, a process engineer, at Calix."T/he 】other/\ impo/rtant technical/ par/amet】ers are ensur\i【ng tha【t we get enough heat into】 the reacto【r and that we put this h【eat in t【h/e right places."The a/i】\m is to be ab】le 】to absorb as mu\ch carb】on 【diox\ide as possible in the safest, m/ost【/ en【erg】y-efficient way.Researc\hers n】eed to constantly assess the safety and efficiency of the whole/【 proce/ss \bo\th】 【\i【\n a co/ntroll/ed laboratory environment and in the\ reactor its\elf\."We take the powder 【befor】e it /go/\es in and measure t/he amount o【f c\arbon dioxide t【hat goes in】 it,"】 】says Hills."Then we measure after pass\ing throu/gh the 【reactor, and we measure【 【that amount of \c/arbon dioxi【de in the powder. And the di/】【ffer】ence is t//he amount \that we cap【tur【e."Researchers\ are now working 】to scale up the tec【hnology 】to captu\re 95 p】er】 cent of the fact/ory´s global carbon dioxide emissio】ns with a view to dev】elopi\ng other circular【 economy 】business models."Be/caus/e we 】are expecting very pure carbon dioxi\de to 】【be cap【tu/red, with】 some purification steps it can /【be/ used for the foo\d industry, it// can \be used for /growing/ plants, it【 can be used for helping /make n】ew fuels, /it can even 【be used in/ m【aterials to help build new prod【ucts【, " says Daniel】 Rennie.\Researchers be【liev\e the t\echn/olog/y can contr\i【bute to reaching the target of 80% re\duction in 【car\bon dioxide emissions i/n Eu】rope by 2050.Journalist name • Ka\ty Dar【t/for/dShare this 】articleCopy/paste the articl】e video embed link below】:Co【pyShareTweetShar【/esendSh【areTwe】etSharesendMoreHideShareSendSh【】are】ShareSh\a】r\eSendShareShar【eY】o】u might also like \ 【 / 】 \ How to increase bio/div/ersity acros】s cities / \ \ \ 】 \ 】 N【e【【w windturbines for green e【ne【rg【/y, che】ape【r a】nd \quicker to build 】 More a】boutIndustry】New technologiesE\n/vir【onmental protec/tion 】 \ Most viewe/d / W\/hat i\nfluence on \climate is the coronavirus lockdown really ha\ving【【?【 【 【 \ Th【\e ne【w AI system safeguarding prema【ture bab/ies from infect【ion / 】 】 /】 【 Messenger RNA: \the molecul【e \that /may teach 】o】ur bodies to beat \cancer / 【 / \ 【Apple an】d Google say t】hey'll work together to trace s【pre【ad /of coron\avi/rus via smartphones 【\ 】 【】 How EU funding is changing the f/ace of Latvia【n innovat/ion 【【 \ Browse today/'s 】ta/gslmP5

EJvc/Cavi【ar/ with c/ompassion is set to revolutionize\ the 】d/elicacy】/04wYK9xh

nOolProtecting life in the Arcti\【c seasG7wa

AVeNAn international ag\reeme\nt signed in 2018 pre【ventively banned all【】 commercial fishing】 in \the【【 】Central Arct【ic Ocean —【 long befor【e any 】fishi【ng could /\real】istically begin. Why was that ban necessary, and how can marine biologists 【ta/ke advantage of】 planned po【lar/ expedition\s to/ f/ind out more about future fishing prospects in the Arct【/ic \high seas?Dr. Pauline Snoeijs 【Leijonmalm, Professor of Marine Ecol【o】gy a【t S】tockholm University, talked to E/uronews hours before lea【ving Troms&os】lash【;, Norway onbo\ard the Po\larstern\ icebreaker f【or the MOSAiC \expedition at the Nort\h Pole.She bega/n by explaining【 \w/hy we n】eed a fishing ba\n in the region:“We don/’t kn【ow a】nything abou【】/t 【the ecosystem,【 and\ we don’t kno【w anyt】h【ing about which fish we\ have! It’s a very /nutr【i/e】nt-poor ecosystem,\ so I expect ver/y little fish. And then if you st【art fishing, th【en you can destroy the ecosy/stem, or th/e balance of the organisms."MOSAiC Exped/ition'/s research camera【Once th】e/ ic】e disappe】ars, there \could be a ru\sh to fish\ t\he are【a\, which lies outside the exclusive eco】nomic zon\e of th【e\ coastal countries“\So that’s 】why we ne【】ed to kno\w】 now what /we have in this sea that perhaps can be/ exp/loited by anyone," P】rofessor Leijonmalm explains.【 "And 】】of course, we need prot【ectio】n for this are【】a. So what we’re going to do i【【】s to build\ a way to protect thi\s ar【ea 【by c/】ol/lect【ing b【ase】line【 data.&l/d【q/uo;We】 are at the very/ beginning of this/.\ What we are doi\ng is now mappi/ng, and this is t\he first expedi\t】ion tha】t&rs\quo;s going to map. And \the big advantage of conn【ecting\ to such【 a big exp/edition is t】hat we get all the environmental data【】 from the ship’s 】program &】mdash;】 s/o we【 do no】t need to】 /\measure the】 chlorophyll /our【se】lves, or the 】【nutrients, or not【 even th\e zooplan【】】kt】on. We \need o】nly to look【 a】t the fish】, and the other data【 we can use, and connect then】 the fi】sh data t\o. /So that’s/ a very big adv【\a【n\tage of these【【 big expeditions./&rdqu【o;/Pol】arstern ic/ebreaker sets sail】 for the North PoleShare thi\】s art/】\icl/eCopy/pas【te th【e /article video embed \link \below:Cop\yShareTweetShar【esen【dShare\T\w【eetShare【sendMoreHideS】hareSendShareShare/Sha】reSendSha\reShareMore aboutGlobal warming and climate changeFisheryArcticEnviro【nmenta/l protectionGreenland / Mo】s】t v\iewed 【 Wh【at i\nfluence on climate】\ is the cor/o/navirus lockdown really having? \ 【 】 】 】 \ 】 / The new AI system s\【【af【eg【uarding prematu】re【 /babies from infectio】n 】 \ 【 Messe\nger RN】A: the molecule that ma/y teach our bodies to \beat cancer 【 /\ 】 \ App/le\ and G】o\【ogle 】say they'll wo/rk \togethe【r to 】trace sprea\d of cor【onavirus via smartphon】es 【 】 \ \ How EU funding /is ch/ang】ing the face 【o/f Latvia\n innovation 】 】 】 【 \ Bro\wse today/'s【 ta\gs9WfK

jUqOThe 【import/ance of res】【toring mar\ine biodiversityDBQe

Can 【econom\ic grow/th and protectin】g the env【【ironment go hand in hand? 】In this episode【】 of 】Bu】siness\ 】Planet】 Euronews travelled t】o A/ust\r\ia to look at the efforts whi/ch are underway to fost【er inn\ovati】on, transform industry and create su【st【ainable growth 】across Europe. "Sustai】nabl【【e econo/mic【 development /aims】 t【/o /reach a balanc【e between envir【onmental\ and climate protection】, qu】ali/ty【 of 】life and economic gr】owth. 】I【t's pos】sible to observ【e, through】 our em】pirical data, that【 the green econ【omy is a driver fo【r】 growth/. In the past fe【w\ 】】ye】ars, \the Austrian environmental technology 【industry has grown almost t\wice as fast/ a【\s the /economy /as a whole in re\cent years," Andreas Tschulik, Austrian environment minist】【/ry.The Eu\ropean Commission is invest】ing 】in】 EU industry for a modern, clean and fair/】 】eco\n】】om/y. One company w\hich epitomise【s this drive \is ECOP Technolog/ies, near V】ienna. The 【co】mpany 【manufac【/tur【【es rotatio【n heat pumps for industrial use. Using innovative techno【logy \the firm helps other companies to recover en\e/rgy and /】save cost【s whi\c】h 】in turn\ help\s protect the e\nvi\ronment【."With our rotation he/at pump we r\each i\n 【specific appl/ications return on【 inves\tm【ents 】with/in three to seve/n years and 【compared to \burning gas,/ but we save an/ enor【mous amoun\/t o【/】f CO2 and this is the reason why we get supp/o】rted by 】the EU th\rough the/ horizon 20 program," says \ ECOP's 】CEO, Bernha\rd Adler. 】 \ECO】P's /innovative work saw it win this y\ear's【 European Busi】ness Aw\ard for Environ\/m】e\nt."Innovation is the key to tr\ansform th\e】 current eco\nomic system 】into a gre\en economy. \/Wit【h】out inn【ov】ati】o\n/ we will n】ot be able to r/each our glo/ba/l climate protection goals. Abov】e average investment into research and 】development】 res【ults in above average grow】th/," in\sists Tschulig. ​ He adds, "\Our top envir【onm\ental po\licy goals are to cut greenhouse gas emissions and /r/educe /consumption.【 A lot o/f compan/ies realise【 this a】nd 【are/ ta/king a【/dvan/tage【 of the 】resulting bus/ines【s opportunit\ies. But t/】he /whole of socie】t/y is ben【efiting【 from thi\s, given t/hat many\ gre\en jobs have been creat】ed throughout the whole valu】e chain."&\#8203; 【 Top EU innovatio【n prioritiesEncouraging innovation and inve】stment to【 crea/te new \jobs and b\oost gr\owth has always】/ been a prior\ity【 for the EU.G/rowth cannot com/e a\t t\he cost of the environme【nt. We need sustainab/ility.Protection of the environment/ and 】sus/tainabl/e development both demand \in/nova\tio/n.Innovatio【n 】bridges t\h【e gap between research an\d the market, making ideas that pr\otect the enviro【nment comm\er【cially\ viable.T\he E/U org】anises the E【urope【an Busines【s 【Awards to recog/nise compan/ies putti】ng inn】】/ovati【on /【a\nd sustainable devel\opment at the heart of their busi】/ness acti/vities.】The a【wards are presented ev/ery two y【ears in five categ/ories: Manage/me【nt, Product and services, Process i【nnovat/ion, International business\ c【oo/peration and Business and bio/div【er/sity.The 2018 】Awar/ds w/ere presented on 14 November in Vienna, Austria.Sha【re thi【s articleCopy】/past\e the article video embed link below:Cop】yShareTweetSharesendShareTweetSh】aresendMoreHideShareSendS/hareShareShareS【endS】hareShareMo/】re aboutBusinessAustriaEnv】iron】mental p【/】/rotection Bro】wse today's ta】gs

gmcQYou can find huge q/uanti【\ties of jelly/fish in European \seas,\ but in\ som\e areas the \number of blooms is【 problemat【ic】.T\h/e \Slo/venian coast on th/e Adriatic Se/a is among those regions\ affected by destructive invasio【ns.Re/search】】ers in the coun/try believe we 】could \somehow take advant/age of this pro\lifera/tion, es\p【ecia【lly in【/】 their poten】tial 【to clean【 up the oceans.Jell【yfish blooms a\re said t】o be a consequence of ove】rfi/sh\i【ng,\ and glo\】【bal war】ming/.Mar/ine chemis/t Katj/a Klun, who's fro】m the Slo/venia Nat\io【nal 】Instit【ute o】】f Bi】ology s/tudies l】ocal s】pecies】, such【 as barrel jellyfish and is i\/nterested in the mucus it secret【es."The r】elease/ of mucus is, of\ 【course, an indication of】 the stress. They want to protect\ th【】/emselves,"【 she says.In coop】eration wit/h Israeli 【res\earch\ers, 】the lab\oratory is de】\veloping a prototype 【of a filt【er for \treat】ment plants, u\sing jellyfish mucus.Their work is based on the a【b【\ility of the viscous l】i\/quid to trap mic【roplastic par】t【\icles.【】But /beyond this, she says "w【e \need to think about 【the sus/tainability of this te\chnology. So there is a need for more research, more pro/jects, and studying so not to be 】de\pendent】 on the 】s【easona【l【ity \of the jellyfish, how to【 cultivat】e/ i【t, and so on".A 】Europ】ean research projec/t cal/led GoJelly is aski【n】g\ whether we】 shoul】d f/i\sh jell】yfish, 】or grow them?"The wor】ld is s【earching fo/r new resources an】d \new mar/ine resources," says Amileh 【Javid【pour, a【 biologist and oceanologist and GoJe【ll【y project coordinato/r."That is 【【where the word blue growth is coming f/】ro\m. GoJelly shows the】 poss【i\bilities of usi【ng this biomass for】 a\ 【circular eco/nom\y"】.Another【 research focus is the possibility\ of\ producing agri【cultural fertilizer.Jellyfish contain r】are nutrients, such a\s phosphate, nitrogen and potass【ium th【at 【ar\e agricultural】 residues releas/e/】d at sea and a【bs】orbe\d by】 the an\ima\l.But scientists fa【ce many cha【lleng\】es, 【starting wit\h conservatio/n."If we \choose to t】reat them fresh, w\e/ can not keep jellyfish fo/r a lo\ng/ time. Therefore, we】 preserv\e them accord/ing to various d\rying proce//sses\," says Thorsten\/ Reinsch an agr】icultura/l scientis】t at\ \Cau K\iel."Other challe\nges are: How can I 【bring this 】drie】d mater\ial to /th/e plant? \Wh\at effect would this h/ave/ on soil micro-organism\s, but also on pl】ant gro/】wth, g/round/water and air quality?"Elsewh\ere an\/d【 Italian team is wor\kin/g on the/ pos\sibility of eating】 them.Their resea/rch is sti】ll underway, but the\y say that once their venom is removed, jelly\fi】sh can\ be【 d】】e】licious and good for your health."This is an extract of a \jellyf【ish that conta/i【ned mic/roalgae inside itse/lf. So in this product, there's/ both jell】yfis/h and microalgae. It h【as st/【rong【 【anti-oxidant properties/ a】nd we h】ave demonstra\ted t【hat it also has the ab\ility to inhibit the /growth of\ human cancer cells,"【 】says Antonella Leone, agricultural g】】enetics, ISPA-CNRBusiness o】ppor\tuni【ties or not, researchers stress【 the /need for an environmental\l\y】\ friend】ly model.1/2/1】【】212Additi】【onal sour【c\es •\ Video ed/itor: Myriam 】Co/pierShare this articleCopy/paste th\【e art/icle video embe】d link below:Cop】yShare/TweetShare】sendShareTweetSharesendM】ore/HideShareSe\ndShareShareS】hareSendShareShareYou might also like / 【\ Could seawe\ed be the fu】el /of】 /the \future? \ 【 / 】 / Why mo】re and more martime com【panies are mak】ing the mo】ve/ /towards E-ves/sel【s / \ 【 \ 】 The deep-rooted tr\uth \abou/t chicory root 】 \ More ab/outpl【asticC】ontam/inati】on\ of 】waterEnviron\me【ntal pro【tectionFauna and Flora【 \ M/ost viewed 】 / 】 What infl/uence on cl】i】mat【e is the 】c/oronav/irus/\ lockdown really having? / / / \The new AI system safeguarding/ premature 【babi//es f】rom in/fection \ / Messenger RN【A: the molecule that may teach our bodies 【to beat cancer/ / 【 / / \Apple a【nd G/oo】gle say the/y'll work 】together t】o tra\ce sp】read of coronavirus via smart【pho】nes /【 \ 【 How EU f】unding is changing the【 face of Latvian innovation /【 \ \ \】 【 Br【owse today's tagsL0XZ

omlVMEPs backed p\la\ns on Wednesday\ aimed【 a】t improving /【the qua\lity \of drink】ing water and reduce pla】stic waste.T/he initiativ【e incl】udes】 p/roposals t\o sl【/ash the maximum limit\s of certain poll\utants and inc/rease access\ to\ free and safe wa】ter in public spaces across the EU.One \of the p\【rimary 【goals/ is to【 increase publ】ic trust in tap water with the intenti【on of dim\ini【shing the use 】】of /plasti\c w\ater bottles. Singl【e-use plas【tics/ are currentl【y t】he m/o/st common form of marine litter found on Europe\an【 beaches, according to \a r【ecent repo/rt.The European 【Parliament estimat\es these new po/licie\s woul/d s【ave【 Eu\ropea/n households over \€60【0m per year.Share this articleCopy/paste the ar/ticl/e video embed link【 b】elow:Copy】ShareTweetSharesen】dShareTwe/etSharesend\MoreHideShare\Se【ndSh/are【Sh/areShareSendShareShare】You m\igh/t also【 like/ \ 】 Micro-plastic\s 】a/re not just a problem for the oceans, the】y're now in \the air /】 【 \ 】 / 【 \ 【/ The wee【k in Europe: Rescu】e plans, MEPs on the】 fr】ontline/【【s & robo-helpers【 \ / \ Meet the 【MEPs returning to【 medicine amid/\ th/e c】oronavirus pandemic \ 【 / 】 More ab//ou【tEU Parliam/】entWat】erEnvironmental protec【ti】on \ 【 Browse today【's tagsJ8Wu

4ahdA】ngela Me【rk\el wants\】 Germany to aim to \n\eutrali/se gas e【missions by 2050XmOh

geVKTradition and innov】ation in car b【odywork\GLPM

YRCKTourism set to bl\oom in Angola’s desert regionrAK6

NV17Easyjet a】nnounced that /【from Tuesday it w/ill offset carbon emissions from al/l its flights in a bid\ to become the world's fi/rs【t /carbon-neutr【al airline.The \low-cost British carrier said the move will】 cost the company &\pound;25 million (€29.2 milli】on) in the next financial year.But\ \T】ransport and E】nviron】m【ent (T&am/p;E) warne【d carbo\n offsetting \is unlike【ly to deliver 】the emissions re/ductions prom/i/sed.Ea/syJe\t's 】a【nnouncement comes amid pressure for airlines to tackle t\heir \en【vironmental impact and surpasses/ recent 】com\mitments made\ by rival compa】nies.IAG, the owner of British Airways, said it will, f】\rom nex【t year, offset carbon emissions on domestic】 fli【ghts o【nly \while oth\e/r airli【ne】s inclu】d【ing\ Luftha/nsa and Finnair hav\e 】created programmes】 allowing 【cu【stomers to offset part of th】eir flights.Aviation is one of t/he fastest-growi/ng sources of greenhous【e gas emissions. 】Accordin】g to t】he\ Eur\o【pean Commission, direct e\miss/ions from av【iatio\n account for about】 】3% of the EU's total gr】eenhouse 【gas e】missions and mor【e than【 2】% \of g\lobal emissio//ns. It estimate/s t\【hat\ "if 【glo/\】bal aviation】 was a country, it would ra/nk in 【the top 10 emit\/ters".Re】ad mo【【re:/ 'R【】ya【nair i】s the【 new coal' as/ it becomes the first airline i】n EU's top ten biggest pol【lu/t】ersTo achieve its 【targ/et, EasyJet will i\nvest in afforestation — the planting of new trees — as wel【l/ as in the prod\【u/ction of renewable energies.【It also announced a\ joi/nt electric plan】e developme/n/t projec/t with【 Eu【】r】opean manu/\facturer Airbus and said it will c】onti\nue to suppo/rt t【he Amer\ican start【up/ Wrig】ht Electric【 wh/ich ai】ms to \p】roduce an all/-electric plane."The \cost of your flight will not be impac【te【d by our 】e【fforts t【o red/uce carbon emissi【ons and \neither will the performa】nce of t】he 】plan/e itself or y【ou\r ov\era\ll \safety," it said in a sta】tement.H\owever, the/ Bru\ss\els-based 【\T&/amp;E re/search g】roup, sa【id that "stro\nge】r action by governments to tax the cli\mate impact of flying and develop clean fuels" are needed\ to cut t】he se\ctor'\s emission/s.It stressed that ov【er/ 20 】EU st\ates don'/t 【tax international avia/tion at all and that no memb\er s【tate taxes jet fuel."A【irlines paying【 oth\e【rs so【 that they can go】 on polluting is not a sol\utio\【n to a】v【iation’s cl/imate】\ 】problem. /Decades of airlines&r/squo; unch/eck】ed】 e\missio【ns grow/\th show】s gover\nments need to step up and regu/late aviation&rs【quo;s climate impact b/y endi\ng the secto【r&r【squo;s t/ax privil/eges a\nd mandatin/g clea\n\ fu/els," Andrew】 Mu\】rphy, T&【amp;E'/s aviation manag\】er, said in a statement.Sha【r】e this art】icleCopy/p/aste the arti【cle video embe/【d link below:CopyShare/Tweet\SharesendS\hareTweetSharesend【MoreHideShareSendSha】reShareS】ha/】reS\endShar\eShareYou 【mi】ght al】so like 【 \ Sparkle looks to a greene【r future with the opening of】 its fourth \da\ta centre in Greece 】 // 】 】 】 Good che【/mi【s】try: help\【in\g busi/ness to come within REACH rules/ 】 【 】 【 】 \ / Help\ing Balt】ic/ busine\sses to become c【l/eaner and greener /\ 】 】 \ Mo】【re aboutEnvi\ronmen【tEnviro】nmental protectionAirplan【es\ Browse toda】y'】;s tags4yRY

zYbxWill L\eon】ardo DiCaprio open his new eco-resort in Belize in\ 2020?lP4s

UzdAO【n t\【h【is wee】k’s Smart】 Regio【ns, we take a pl/unge i/n the European U/nion’s】 longest r\iver: the Danube. Since ancient【 ti】mes, the riverbed has see\n m】any chan【ges but some of its inhab【itants are in d/\anger. The Europ【ean Cohes/ion Polic\y //is providing a push to protect \the ri】ve\r’s ecosy【stem.The Danube is the second lo\ngest river in 】【Eu\ro【pe. \Its path 】can be t】ra\ced from\ Germany t/o the Black Sea. L\oved by many, the D/anube’s critical ecosystems a/re now being】 prote【cte【d and/ preserv\ed. Georg Frank】 is\ a biologist and coo】rdi/nator\ at the DANUBEPARKS network, an organ【isati\on \that p\rotects are】as】 around【 the ten count/ries crossed by t】he/ river.&ldqu/】【o;We have 【more than 900 islan【ds 【a\long t/he Danube […] of wh【ich【 147 islands which are absolutely natural and, in the 】frame of\ t】his /wild isl\and 【initiative, w】/e try to protect】 】- in particular 】/- these //【wild island/s covering se/veral /10,000 hectares."The Danube Park\s network is wo\rking to pre】ser】ve the\ basin of the 2885km river: 5,】00】0 animal species/ 】and 2000【 plants live alo】ng its shores./ /It has a budge/【t of 3 million eu【ros,/ of \which 2.【6 m/illion euros is covered by the E】U/'s Coh】esion P/olic\y.T\【he DANU/BEPARKS rep】resen【tatives pay particular attention to, what they c/all, fla【gship spe\cies. By preserving their habitat, they also prote/ct th【【e animals or 【plants l【iving there./Twenty years of work/ h\ave shown prom【ising re/sults in the res【toration of nat【ural environments. Euronews spok【e to【 Attila Fer/sch (the deputy】】 d\ire/ctor of th/【\e Fertö/;-Hanság/ national 】/park) about the result/s.“7/0-75% in the/ Hungarian Dan】ube b】io】tops/, D【anube habi【【tats, which were【 involved in this pr【oject are i】n good status. Probab\ly the】 other 25% of\ the D/anub/】e habitats are no】t critical, but】】 we【 hav/e to work 【【together".1212121212121】2Share this /articleCopy/paste the article /【video 【embed link be\low:CopyShar\eTwe】etSharesen【d\ShareTwee【】【tSha\/resendM】oreHideShareSendSh【areShareShareSendSha\reShareMore aboutEnvironmental pro】tectionFaun/a and FloraAustria / Brow/s\e today's\ tagslSwj

JZUb\Te】xt sizeAaAa/A s\how【case of t】ho/usands of completel\y sustainable f\abrics is co】ming to London, or】ganiser The Sustainable【 Angle has announced.【The not-for-profit o/r/g/anisation has been a rele】ntl】\ess/ 【s【upporter of innovative/ lower\ carbon solutions to fashio/n&rsquo【;s biggest problems【 since 2010 and hopes that this/ \ev/ent 】will encourag/e ev/en/ more /designe】】rs and creators【 to adopt 】respo/n【sible solutions.】This will \be the ninth e/dit】ion of the Fut】ure Fabrics Expo which is the l\argest sho【wcase of sustainable fabrics of its k】ind. /With each f\abr【ic, informa/tion about where it has com/e from and 】/the/ environm\e/nta【l footpri/nt\ of【 its】 manufacture w\il/l be/【 provided. I【ncreas【ing tr\an/sparency in【 how our clothing i/s made is on】e\ way to he/lp bot【h designers and co【nsumers to 【make responsi\ble choice【s.Materials /o\n show will】 include 】the i/ncreas\i【ngly popular TENCEL Lyoce\ll and Modal as well as【 several fa/brics th】at take an innovative approach to post-cons【】umer recycling. Wi\th fashion waste /firm【ly in】 【the spotl【igh【t this season, there is a real dri【ve from /\consum】ers towa/rd more circular soluti【ons\】.These m\ode【rn approa\】ches will be e/xhibited alongside co/mpanies that ch】ampion t/rad\it\ional sustainable ma】te/rials/ like line/n and bast. Although less common i/n modern designs, these ancient f【】ab/rics are biodeg】radable and water-efficient. 【The plant fi【b【res fr】om 【】【whi】ch\ they are grown can ev\/en sequester C【O/ from the atmosphere.Founders of the expo, 】The【 Su】stainable Angle, hope t】o change the fash/ion i】ndustry \for the bet/ter s【o that, instea/d of stri】ppin/g resources an/】d p/oll\uting environments, \it can【 have a 】po/sit/i/ve impa【ct on n\ature an\/d the communities that 】\make o】ur cloth/es.Read/ More | W\【hat is Tencel? \T//h【e s\ustainable fabric e/v【eryone is 】talking /aboutClaire\ Bergk/am\p, Global Director of S【us【ta】inability and Innovation, Stella McCartney (left) in/ 【convers\ation/ with Orsol/a de Castro, Co-foun】der of Fashion Revolution】 (right)【\.Suzanne Plunkett /The 【Sustaina】\ble AngleAs well as showing off materials th\at designers can u】se t】o /decrease the e】nviro】nmental impact of t\heir own 【de】signs, the F/uture】 F【abrics\ Expo will also h【o\st panels to h\elp】/ ed/ucate atte\n】de/es and fac\ilitate discussion between industry exp【e【rts. Panels for\ the ninth Future F【abrics Expo will b/e】 focus\ed around r【egenera】t\i】ve, circul/ar ap】proaches to sust\ainable des【ign and how fashion can be a “powerful force /for positive change”.Future\【/ Fashion ExpoS\uzanne Plunkett /The 【Sustainable AngleAt 】a /p】an/el at last 【year’s event, Claire Bergkamp, Glob/al Director of Susta】】】inability and \Innovatio】n at Stella\ McCart/ney emphasised t\he value【 of eve\nts like t\his i】n helping to eradicate unsustainable mat】er\ial\s from t【he【 fashion in【du\/stry; “We have to \repl/ace them with i/nnova】t\ive, sustainable alternatives. The o/】ther half of inno】vati】on in the【】 future of fabrics has to be about rethinkin】g t【he syst】em【s 【tha】t we /have now…/【How can we find lower-im【pact ways o\f【】 】creating things?”.Part of the /Expo last year al】】so in【cluded two curated areas dedic\ated to fashion bra\nds fully embraci\ng responsib/le s】our\cing and circularity in thei【/r 【collections. New collaborati/on/s【 between leading designers and companies c/reating inno】vative new material\ technologies are the ideal outcome from this event.Suzanne Plunkett /The 】Sustainable A】ngle【The \【event will take place from the 29th-3】0th Januar/y 2020 at\ Victoria House, Bloomsbur\y Square, 】L】ondon. Tick/et registratio/n f/or de【【signers/ and brands /can be/ found h\er【e.Share this article \ 】More /from l\ife9E7x

AZUfProtecting life in the Arcti\【c seasyLdN

KfkVT\ext sizeAaAaFr【【om food 【wast/e to/ woodchips, a wide sel【ec/tion of surprising 【raw material】s can end\ up s【erv/ing as an alternative to plastics. Th】ey can be biodegradable in/ just a few months or even c/ompostable as opposed】 to the synthe\tic plastics, which stays \with us fo\r sev【eral【【/ h】\undreds【 of years in 】the\ landfills and release\s a lo\ng list of toxic che【mi\cal【/s /into our env【iron\m/ent. Rec/ycling can help ease some of these proble/ms\, but th【e be】st solution seem\s to 【repla/ce t【hem with more eco-f】ri【endly m】aterials】.However, some bi】od/egradable plastic has already attracted critical rem\a【rks, such as the one made from hemp and/ co\rn starch 【a【mong ot/hers. There are debat/es that pro\ducin】g these can resu/lt in a】】n even /greater amount】 of pollutants】,【 due to the pro\d】uctio/n with fertilizer【s and pe【sticides as well as the chemical p/rocessing】 nee【ded to】 turn organic material int\o plastic./Living 【it m\ade a selection of【 some recent】\ innovation/】s, w/hich need no land 【and no pesti】cides t\o produce,/ 【as ma/inly usi【【ng what is given by nature.Fr【om seaw\eed to biod//egradable plasticLiv】ing it rep\orted 【earlier\ abo【ut researchers, who have devised a possible solution/ for dur\able plastic waste, 】i/nspired\ b\y the oce//an. Scienti【sts \at Tel Aviv Univ】ersity have created a biodegradabl】e plastic by cultivating natural polymers made by micro-organisms t/h】at feast on 】se【a【weed al\gae.Or【/ganic plastics f/ro/m avocado s\eedsAvocado seeds are a h/uge industrial /waste 【in Mexic】o, henc】e a lo\cal c【ompany/ came【 up\ 】wi【th th/\e idea of【】 giv【i\ng 【them a \/second life\ as biodegrad/ab/le plastic. Biofas】e today produces /avocad【o【 seed 】stra【ws a//nd cutler\ies. Accor/ding to th\em, as i/t is foo【d w】aste, it/ reduces the costs/, so\ th】ey claim that they\ can produ\ce it for th\e same pri】c\e as】 regula【r palstics.The precious material in l】o】bsters' exoskeletonS/he\llfish, such as lobste【rs, could o/ffe/r a solution to the scourge of si【ngle-use plastic thanks to a bio-polymer in their shells called chitin. 】A London/-based startup The Shellworks is developi【ng\ a met】hod to transform thi/s material -】 normall/y destine】d\ for the 】rubbish\ /\ti【p - 【into】 a novel bioplastic that/'【s\ both biode/grada】ble and recyclabl】e.Click on t【he video a】bove to learn h【ow l/o【bst/ers can provide an alternative \for single-use p\lastic.Share this\ article More from lifeUEoO

erzqCould jel/ly【fish be th/e answer t】o fighti【ng ocean pollution?jM0T

LuVvAmazon 'Forest Guardia/n&#】039】; shot in /the head by illegal loggersZ3IA

2CFRSoybean\ s【kiwear is th/e new plan】t-ba/【\sed tre【nd of 2020yIEi

1.NOeIPush to /restore one of 【Europe's/ o\ldest Rivers3s78

2.AWOK\Clima\te change i/s\ makin【g Arctic waters more access】ib/le to/ vessels, 】\raising the c\on/troversial prospe【c】t of more ind/ustrial-\scale fishing/. On the lates/t episode of】 \Ocean, Euronews】 looks at what'\s being done】 to prev/ent\ /the】】 threat to \the 【A】rctic e】cosystem.Greenland i】s warming\. Among/ other thi【ngs,\ this【 means long\er f】ish【ing seasons. Be/tween the ic///ebergs o/f Iluliss】at, it&rsq【uo;s 】a gold ru/sh. Fish\ing boat】s equipped with【 mo【dern machinery pull up hundreds of ki/los of catc【h every d/ay.Ilulissat fisherman Marti】n J&os【las/h;rgense\n is worried:&ld【quo;There】\’s too much fishing goi【ng on around here】. It’/s so p】rofitable\ now that al【【l the】 b/ig 】】fish h【ave been taken out; we’re catching smaller fi/sh now”.Sleds, dogs and boatsTo be\ closer to buyer/s, fisherm\en are moving from 【coastal villag/es to ci\ti【es. 【The【 population of Oqaatsut, an \Inuit s\/ettlement on Greenland’s west】 c/oast, ha/s f】al/len to less th/an 30 people. Sle】d d\ogs, tra【ditionall【y us】ed for【 ice fishing and 】huntin/g, have been d【ecimated i/n man/y commu/nities, as th【e 【w\ar】/mi\ng climate makes bo【at/s mo【re usefu【l than dogs.&rdquo/;The sledding 【used】 to start in【 October," say/s/ Oqaatsut fish【erma/n Steen Gabr/ielsen, "but now that there’s not eno【ugh ice, we ca【n just use bo\ats all year round.&r\dquo;Arctic Se\a Ice Reaches 2019 Minimum Extent\C\hanging ecosystemAs the seas \get war/mer, new species of fish are finding their way to Greenland&】rsquo;【s c【oa/sts —【 【the/se include mackerel, herring, At/lantic \bluefi】n/ tuna and cod. But not every\one is ha/ppy. \The fishermen say t【heir most profitable catch — halibut — /is getting harder to find during the warmer pa/rt of th【e year.“Halibut li\kes cold water," explains Niels Gundel/, a /fisher\m【an 】in Ilulissa/t.【 "As summers /b】ecome warmer and longer 【it moves away, to stay wher【e【 it&rsq】uo;】/s【 c【\ool.”Immin\ent/ dan【】gerI/n the fut\ure, retreating sea i】ce an【d /changes in/ fish stocks could bring commerc/ial fish】ing fleet【s into th】e unprotected international wate】rs a】/round t】\he North Pole.Scien/t\ist】s a\【re sounding t】he alarm: unregul\ated fishing could destr】oy the poorly studied e】cosystem of/ the Centra/l Ar【】ctic Ocean】, where fish can b】e sparse and essent】ial to the s/urvival of】/ other【 animals.In a bid t\o stave off t】his imminent thr\e【at/, the European Union br【ought all\ main parties togeth/er in Ilulissat to agree on】 a c/】omme】rcial fishing】\ ban 】in the Arc/tic hi\gh seas\ for at least 16 ye/ars.【T【his land/mark internati】onal a】g】reement was s/【igned by the EU, C/anada, C\hi\na, Denmark (inclu/ding Greenl】and and【 the Fa】roe Island/s), Iceland, 】J【】apan, the /Republi】】c of Kor\ea, Norway, Russia and the U\nited States. Together, thes\e 【pa\rties represent some 75% of gl【obal GDP.Arctic cat\ch 2017Under this legally bindi【ng agreement, /the 】C/entral Arctic area - roughly the size \of the Medit【er/】ranean Sea - will remain off-limits for 【f【ishi【n\g fle【ets, at【 leas】t unti/l scientists con】firm\ that fishing i】n the r\egi】on can be done su【stai】nably.Preca/utionary ap【proachAt the Arctic \University of Norway in \Troms/ø, Professor To\re Henrikse/n he\ads the】】 Norweg\ian Centre for the Law of the/ Sea\.&l/dquo;T\his agree\ment/ is reflect\ing the precauti/o】nary a】pproach, that whe/n you// ha【ve little or very\ inadequate /\inform\/ation you should act\ cautiously \and only reg【ulate, and adapt the regu/lation, according to 【the in【formation/ you have," Professor Hen\rikse】n explains. "P】reviously, 【you started fishing, /and then you regu】late it. And th】en at 【that stage,】 it could b\e too late.”/Map\ping the Arctic se/asThe【 futu】re of the】 ban 【will depend on th\e find\ings o/f the scien/tific c/onsortium le【d by pro】fessor Pauline /Sn】\oeijs Leij/onmalm. Sh】e heads a\ t】eam of European researchers on the MOSAiC expediti】【on — a year-long silent ice drift close to the North \Pole.Onboard th/e Polar\stern icebreaker“Normall【y, wh\en】 【the ic/ebreak】er mov【es through 】the\ \ice, you w/ill/ not get good acoustic data,/ because th】ere/’s too much sound fro/m t【he i/cebreaker. No/w we&rsquo【;\ll have a whole year \】o\/f acoustics, and it\ 【is just a d\ream!&/rdquo;As w】【ell【 as using sona/r, the /\EU-suppo//rted r\esearchers will rec】ord vid/eos with a deep-water【 camera, take environm】ental DNA sam【ples at various depths, a/nd for the f【irst time catch some Central Arctic fish.】MOSAiC Exp/edition/'s d\eep-water/ re/search camera“We will\ be able to a/nalyse its stoma\ch, 】its/ stable isotopes, i/t【】】【s fatty ac\i【ds," Profe】ssor Leijonmalm says. "It will tell us 】about the 】he】alth【 of the fish, and where/ it has com\e/ from because \fish mi\grate — so we /w【ill have a 】lot of info】rmat【ion, just by having/ a fish in our hands.”The disco【veries of thi\s \and fu\t】ure】 expe【ditions will deter\mine wheth【er fi【sh】ing /\in the Central Arctic Oce\an /can be done sustainably &mda】sh; or whether \these h/igh se】as should remain untouche\d for the dec【ades to come.】To wat】ch th【e f【ull epi\sode of /Ocean, click on 【the media pla/yer above121212121212121212Share this/ articleCop】y/paste the article 】【video embe【d li\nk below】:CopyShareTweetSharesen/dShareTweetSharesen【dMoreH/ideShareSendShare【ShareShareSendShare【ShareYou might als\o like \ \ 【 】/ 【 \ EU fish/ quota q\uarrel\ - ministe/rs hail d\ea/l, NGOs slam overfishing 【 【 】 \ 【 \ 】 Watch: Thirty-】five years of Arctic thaw in\ tw/o minut/es / / \ 【 】 【 S】cientists have embarked fro】m\ /Norway on the longest-ever expedit/ion to the /Arctic 【 【 【 More ab/ou/tGlobal warming and cli】mate change【FisheryArcticEnv\iro】nment\al prote/ctionGreenland 【 /\【 【 Mo】st viewed 【 【 【 / \ 【 \ \ What infl\uenc】e o\n climate is/ the coronavirus 【lockdown \r【eal【【ly havi】ng? / 】 The new AI system safeg】【uar/d\【ing premature /babies fro/m infecti\o【n \ 】 【 】 \ 【 / Messenger RNA: the molecule that may/ teach our b【odies to beat cancer【】 \ 【 】\ 【 】 \ A】pple a】nd Google 】say they'll work toge【ther【 to】 trace spr】ead of coronavi/rus via smartphones \ // 】 How EU funding is chan【ging t【h\e face/ of 【L】【atvi/an in】novation\ 【 【 Browse tod【ay's\ tagsIoD4

3.99P8Text sizeAaAa"Electric Revolution"/ - says the boar】d at the entrance of the first ever electric motor【cycle e】xhib/ition【【, held in 【L【【os Angel】es, California. Be】/hin\d the walls of the futuris\tical/ly shaped Pete\rsen Automot】ive 】Museum\, t\h/er【e are mo/de【l\s su\ch as a Tarform motorbike whi【ch i【【s 3D prin【ted 】from biodegradable \plastic and the old】\es【\t electric【 】/mot\orcycle \usin\g bat\teries from a nuclear submarine.The show is a mix\ of custom e-moto【rcycles, racing bikes】 and those /that are, will /be】 or co\uld be in production. The Motorcycle】 Arts Foundation, a New York-bas\ed /no/n-prof\it\ \organisation th/at fuses m【/otorcycle culture/ \with the arts, gue【s/t curated the【 【exh】ib】it. According to /the organisation's spokesperson John Lewis,【 \t/he exhibi/tion 【is/ \an 】attempt to【/ breathe life in【to a struggling \motorc\ycle i【ndu/stry amidst an ele/ctric transport revo\lution.Harle【y David/son /provided th\ree proto/types from its EV programme 【including the highly anticipa/t/ed 【2020】 LiveW/ire, which 【goes【 on 【sal/e fo/r\ urban u】se this fall. /"A l\ot is r】iding on the lau/nch\ o】f this model bec/ause【 al\l other motorcycle companies will be watching】 to see whether they should \follow suit and】 e\x/pa/nd th/eir 【electric sites themselves, if /s\a/les go 【\well," said Lewis.The electric revoluti【on in thi/s industry might\ be delay】ed by the many gas-\fue【lled 】biker【s w【ho\ lik\e t】he】 roar of 【thei\r bike versus the silence \of the batte】r】y. "It's going to b】e more e/xpen【sive】 to own an el】ectric mo】t\orcycle than an entry-lev\el gas motorc\ycle. But I think people \are really interested【 in sustainability, people 【are【 interested in g/e】tting away/ from gas, but p【eopl【e are also】 /just/ interested in new method/】s of【 transportation," add\ed /Jessie Gentry, write】r and\ photog/rapher for RideApart o//nline mag】a\zine and Mo\torcyclis\t online.Click on t【he video ab】ove to see the various models exhibited on the sh】ow.Share this article More【 from lifec7i5

4.kOw8A】ngela Me【rk\el wants\】 Germany to aim to \n\eutrali/se gas e【missions by 20506aGu

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7GyqText si【zeAaAaThe common hippo】p【o/ta/mus is know\n for th\eir /rapacious appetites and spending a lot /of/ time/\/ in water, no wond】e【r, 'river hor【se is the literal En】glish translation o\f【 the Greek word Hipp【opotamus/. T\hey spend up to 16 ho/ur/s a day submerg】e【d in rive/rs and la】kes to keep their massive bodies cool under th/e hot African sun. And in t//he rest of /their】 time? They consume】\ bet/ween 25-40 kilos of grass.And with【 these two \act【ions, they already do a lo【t for th/ei【r env/iro【nmen/t. A recent study b\/y /University of Antwerp 】biolo】g\ist J\onas Schoelynck and his/ 】col/leagues, published in Scienc【e Ad/vances found hippo/' daily hab【its pl/ay a key role in maintainin/g】 e/co】syste【ms. Th\【e scientists fo】und out about their key r/ole【 by/\ /】analysing s/ample/s from the Mara R\iver, which runs throu【gh t】he Maasa/i Mar【a National Reserve, a savann\ah in Kenya.The mam//mal】s living in this park are protected, h【oweve】r\, ou/tsid/e o】f t】hese a/r\ea/s scient/ist\s sa/y h\ippo numbers/ are down. The IUCN Red \List describes the hippos as vulnerable and now scientists are war/ning 【tha】t t\h/e dw【indling number of hippos across A/fr\ica/ \is potentially harmful to the continent's /rivers and la/k】es.Clic/k on the video a/bove to see how hippo\s make th】e ecosystem run around them.Share this article More \/f】rom pl】acesVcK4

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67RvSwedish env【ironmental【 activist Greta Thunber/g ha/s 】been speaking about her trip across /the/ Atlantic o【】n an envi】ronmentally-friendly 【yacht. She said the 【/journe【y on the zero-em【is\sions vessel】 "wo】ul【d be challengi/【】ng for 】everyone abo/ard".Thu\nberg will travel on\ t【he/ M/alizi】a II &m】das\h; a\ ra【cing boat fitte\d with solar panels 】and underwa\ter【 t\urbines that generates no carbo【n emissions — to attend the two United Nat\ions【 cli【\ma/\te conference/s in New York and Santiago,】 【Chile. Thunbe\rg】, who re】fuses to take【 aeroplanes because of the/ir imp\act on \the environment, sa】】id the trip would be "qui【te the advent/ure" 】and that【 she "expected it to be 】c【hallenging at tim/es" dur【ing a press confe/rence before her d\eparture.She】 will be joined on the【 jour/n【e【y, which should take around two weeks, by her fathe】r. They will make the cross】in/g with 【captain B\【】oris Herrmann, Pierre Casiraghi,【 th\e grandson Monaco’s late Prince】 Rain\ier III, as well as Natha【n】 Grossman, a document】ary \maker from S\weden.The 】teenag】er said she didn't feel bad\ or a】nxious during t【e】st runs and/ that she only 】exp\erien】/ced seasicknes】s for a few minutes befor\e i】t went away.Ask】ed what sh/e hoped t【o accomplis/h】 with her t】rip, Thunberg \said she hoped to "inc\/re\/as】e】】 awarenes\s amon/g 【peo\ple in general\ so \【【they sta/rt realising /that we are in a【】n【\ emergency."Supporters of the teen\ activist shared their support for her on/ social/ media."The/ yacht【 she will be\ sailing on is a ra【cing yacht and \it is anything but c【o】mfortable. And 】even in a comfortable y】acht】 crossing the Atlantic is no /picn】ic. You g】o girl! Big cudos for finding an alt【ernative to flying【!" wrote one/ user.The Swede said previou/sly that s】he wanted to at\tend】 the summit in New Yo\rk on September 23 b【ut didn'/t k】now h/ow to ge】】t there \without going by plane or cruis\e ship\, \w【hich both have high emissions."Taking a boat】 to/\ No】rth Ame【rica i/s 】b【as【ically im【po\ssible," she 】was\ cite\d by AP as saying.Thunberg took the oppo/rt】un【ity to thank the Mal】\izia II crew】 for helping her w/】ith her /project.According \to Germ【an n\/onprofit Atmos\fair, roundtrip from 【London to New/【 York gener/ates on average【 986kg of CO per pa【ssenger. While the Mal/izia II 】】runs on sola\r-powe\r and und】erwater \turbines\ generating el\ectr【ical p】ow/er with 【zero carbon emissions.It is not k\nown how Th//】u【nberg, 】who is ta【k/ing a sabbatical i/】n t\he US, will ret】urn to Europe.Share \this articleS\【hareTwee\tShar\e【send/ShareTweetSharesendMoreHideShareSend【Share\S】h/\areSha\reSendS/h\areShare/You migh//t【 also li/【ke / / / 】 \ Watch: Gre】ta Thunber】g sails into New York for UN】 climate \change【 summits【 / 【 'Shock&\#039; as s【【cienti【】sts find 【plastic \microbead【s in /remote Arc/tic ice】 \ 【【 \ 】 Is Christma】s d/】estroyin\g the planet? \ / 【More abou\tGreta ThunbergEnvironmen\tEnvironmental protection Browse today�【39;s tagssUFx

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CFJJTe/xt si【zeAaAa‘Tis the seas】on to be snowy. Ac【c【ording to\ researc】h by【 Club Med, sustainable, pl\an【t-based 】materials will be the newest trend in\ the\ ski worl/d come 2020.The research emerges as demand for plant-based food i/ncreases year on year, wi\th more c/onsum\ers /choosing ve】getarian and vegan /opti/ons on a weekly basi【s. There has be【en a 39% surge 【in p【lant-based【 eat/ing in Eur/op【e an\d in the】 US,\ /A\m】er】ic】an consumers \purc/has【ed 228 million pla【/nt-【base\d burgers 【between Janu】ary and Ma【y this year.It’s no won】der the【】 ski industry is followi】ng suit, with winter\ hol\iday provider【 Club Me】d stating peop】le want more fro/m their c【lothing and】 an emphasis o【n “ethi】cal ski fa【shio\n.”Accor】ding to \predictions, snow wear will increasingly be made from synthetic a【nd plant-based fa【brics wh】ich are made from soy】beans and/ hemp. /This is/ t\ha\nks to 75% o】f co\nsum【ers wan/ting to m【ake more eco-fri/endly ef【forts to prevent 【c【limate change and more than a third of on\l/ine shoppers \making stricter purchases.Plant-based do【wn/ ski ja】ckets and no\n【-leathe【r boa boots/ are 【f\ore\c/】ast dominate the market/. The jackets will b【e nice and snug\, but cruelty-fr\ee,【 and【 bo/ots wi】ll n\o longer be mad/e using leather. Instead, v\egan alternatives will be on offe/r and 100% GOTS (global o\/\rganic textil】e st/andard) certified organ/ic wool gloves and hats will also be /p\opu\lar.The same study al/so predi\cts tha/t sk\iwear will be revampe】d from a technologica】l perspecti\ve too. We\ will /see the adv/ent【\ of Bluetooth gloves】,/ Ultra HD Smar【【t cameras and ice-repellent snow boots to enhance performance 】in 2020. Overall, skiiers【 are n】ow after better p】erformance, im/proved safety and a sus【tainabilit/y element to \the products 】th/ey are purchasing. Estelle Gi\raudea/u, Manag/ing D/ir】ector UK & 【Northern Europe/ at Club Med said\,&】ldquo;This is /【a/n ex\citi\ng ti\me f/or ski fashi【on. O】【ver the d【\eca///des we have se/e\n clothing】 brands develop exciting new products and wit/h technology advancing】 at suc】h a fast rate, we expect even /more advancements to come.&\rd/quo;T\he【 best eco-friendly skiwear av\ailabl】e no【wEXA Jacket, Pict】u\re Organ【ic Ski\wear, €2【65Picture Organic are a B Corp certified skiwear brand 】with a firm focus on sustainable 】practi】】ce and fabrics. E【ve】ry【 aspect of t【heir /busin【es】s\, from/\ \sou/rce 【m/aterials to \p/ackaging, is tr【anspare/nt and envir\/onmentally-frie/ndly. For ins【tance, they reject the traditional way of /making snow ja【ckets which requi/res pe【trole【um ext\raction. 100% of their prod/uc】ts use【 org/anic, 】rec【ycled an【d bi】o-sourced mater/ials. The EXA jacket is made f【rom 64% r【ecy【cled/】 polyeste】r\ and durable PFC-/free water-repellent treatment, but \does/n't co/mpromi/se on warmth or bre/athabili/ty. These【 de【【sig【ns\ are our f【av】ourite【s. EXA \JacketPi/\cture Organic S】kiwearOpen One 3L Shell Pan\【ts, Openwear, &eu】ro;】329Op\】enwear combi/ne high【 functionality with ethical pr【oduction, /【sus【\tainable\ mat】erials \an】d honesty. Th】e company was f/ounded on the pri【nci】ples of community and t/r【ansparency by Ma【rt\ijn Jeg/erings and /produces stylish, h/ighly f】unctiona【l【 skiwear. Out\erwear is ma/de from eithe\r recy】cled nylon or r】/\ecycled PET bottles】 and \all prod【u】cts bo】ast 20K waterp【roofness. \We love the/se shel/l pants, which come /in four colours.Open One 3L Shell/ PantsOp/enwearMen's\ Pow\der Bo\wl Jacket/,\ Patagonia, €44 (£【;38/0【)Patagonia'\s ski range is world-renow\ned【, offering durable, win\dproof protection and guaranteed warmth. The outdo】or brand has i\mpressi】ve su】stainable】 cred【enti\als, au】diting the/ mater【ials and metho/d/s used,\ taking responsi【【\【bility for the ent/ire life cycle 】of prod\ucts an【d e\xamining h】/ow 【th【ey use resources at our buildings 】an】d facilities.The Pow\d】er 【Bowl Jacke/t is built with /a 100% re\cycled p\ol\【】yeste\】r GORE-TEX face /f【abr【ic a\nd is Fair Trade Certified™ sewn. The questio【n is【, Peppergr【as\s Gre】en or Bal【kan Blue?M】en's 】Powder Bowl JacketPatagoniaS\hare this article\ Mor【e from\】 styleRTbR

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2hIFRoc【k star 】pol\i【tics 】in Romania8aNb

K1旧物回收Oj

uneKText si【zeAaAaThe common hippo】p【o/ta/mus is know\n for th\eir /rapacious appetites and spending a lot /of/ time/\/ in water, no wond】e【r, 'river hor【se is the literal En】glish translation o\f【 the Greek word Hipp【opotamus/. T\hey spend up to 16 ho/ur/s a day submerg】e【d in rive/rs and la】kes to keep their massive bodies cool under th/e hot African sun. And in t//he rest of /their】 time? They consume】\ bet/ween 25-40 kilos of grass.And with【 these two \act【ions, they already do a lo【t for th/ei【r env/iro【nmen/t. A recent study b\/y /University of Antwerp 】biolo】g\ist J\onas Schoelynck and his/ 】col/leagues, published in Scienc【e Ad/vances found hippo/' daily hab【its pl/ay a key role in maintainin/g】 e/co】syste【ms. Th\【e scientists fo】und out about their key r/ole【 by/\ /】analysing s/ample/s from the Mara R\iver, which runs throu【gh t】he Maasa/i Mar【a National Reserve, a savann\ah in Kenya.The mam//mal】s living in this park are protected, h【oweve】r\, ou/tsid/e o】f t】hese a/r\ea/s scient/ist\s sa/y h\ippo numbers/ are down. The IUCN Red \List describes the hippos as vulnerable and now scientists are war/ning 【tha】t t\h/e dw【indling number of hippos across A/fr\ica/ \is potentially harmful to the continent's /rivers and la/k】es.Clic/k on the video a/bove to see how hippo\s make th】e ecosystem run around them.Share this article More \/f】rom pl】aces4v2F

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4j6jDubai&r】\squ/o;s airports ha\ve banned all single\ use plastics as t【h\】e city works towards a plas/tic-free futur】e.It comes as the attitu/de/ towards si】ng\l】e use plastics /i\/s changi\ng./ In Dubai, 90 pe】r cent of peop】le say they are making a conscious effor/t\ to reduce their own plastic waste consumption】.Nearly fo【ur in five say t\hey rec/ycle more no/w than they d/id five years a\go. A\n/d one in four people say they're en】couraged to recycle more by corporations championin【g pla】】stic-free initiatives.Dubai Inte\rnational 【Airport \along with Dubai W】orl\d Ce\ntra】l welcome a/lmost 9】0 million passeng\【ers each y/\ear【. B\//ut with 【those passengers comes 5,/5【By 2050 around 80% \o/f th/e w/orld's po/pula\t】ion w\ill 【be【 living i\n urban areas.【Currentl\y, they occ\upy【 3% of the Earth's】 surface but produce around 72% of gr/eenhouse gases.Gro\wing urba【nization along with climate change will have a 【seriou\s impact on 】o/ur life in /【citie】s in\ ter/ms o\f air quality, warmer tem】peratures and high\er 】【floo】【d 【risk.But /so【lutions 【to reducing the environment\al impact and i【mpro/ving people's quali【ty of life\ ha/【s been found i/n nature/.Scientists【 working at the European project UR\BAN Gre\en-Up【 in Va/【【【l\ladoli】d, /Spa】i//n are te/sting Nature-\Based Sol【utions (NBS) that could a【llow sustain】able urban development.【Involvin\g 25 partner\s from 9 countrie\s /and 8 cities, the p】rojec/t found that the】 key is in th/【e natural properties which ca】n be employed to】 mitigate climate change effects.URBAN 【Gr【een-Up proj【ect coordinator, R\a&uac\ute;l Sánche】z Fr/ancés, explains】 【that some plants can wo/rk as a therm【o-re/\gul】a/to】r and reduce the temperature of 【s【urround/ing【s./"For th】at, we have solutions like green roofs, mobile v\ertical garde】n \or green\ f/aca/des."An im】【por【ta【n】t part of/ t/he project is dedicated to 【th】】e tr【e/atment of air\ an\d】 rainwater in cities.S】pecific type/s of plants, thro/ugh】 their leaves and roots, can work \as natura\l filters."/That solution is an urba【n biofilter," sa/\ys Franc&eac】ute;s】/\. "We used /to call /it green \【chi\mney. We want【 t\o install it on the roof close to the chimneys to clean up th/e】 【【output of\ combustion.""This system is able 【to mainly catch n】itrogen oxides an【d 【\【part/icu【late matter, the two m\ain pollutants 】issued by vehicles and heating systems.The po【tential of nature-based sy【\stems is significant.For example】, in Valladolid a cycle \lane and a】 g【ree】n pavem/ent could pre\v\ent the emiss\ion\ of n/early 200 tonnes CO₂//; and reduce \te/mperatures by 5°C du/ring summer.But the cit\y&\r【squo;s configurat\ion 【/is】 a 【fa/ct【or to】 deal with/."We h】\ave to solve some iss【ues, the main one is t】he lack 】\of sp】ace. Then, w】e \also have problems 【【with o】ccupy】【ing public spaces, b/ecause we 】have unde】【rground w【ater【 pipes, e】lect/ri\c n【etwo【rk, underground p\arking," says Alicia Villazán Cabe【r【】o, a s】enior e【nvi/ronmental consultant at Valladoli【d city 】council【.Valladolid, /Spain, Izmir, Turkey and】 Liverpool, UK are the /three front r/unners 】citie】s wh【】】ich are t/e/sting more than \forty na【\ture】-based methods.Liverpoo】l【 is a city with huge traffic density: 1.35/ b】illion /vehicle】 miles were travelled on】 its roads in 2018 acc\ording t\o officia【l statistic//s.B【ut solutions like arboreal interventions, for instance, are ex】pected to r【educe carbon】 emission【s by 5.55 tons p】er ye】ar and te】mpe/rature】s by 2-4°C during 】the summer seas】on."We have issues \wit【h air q/uali\/ty in Liverpool. We【 /h【av【e a few hotsp】ots 】\around the ci【ty so \【these\ trees will hel/p us clean up 【there,"【 says Fernando N\u/&/nt】ilde;ez Veiga, the/ divisi\onal /ma】nager for majo//r\ hi】ghwa】ys/ projects at Liver】/p】o/ol city /council."The trees are just pha】se one. We ha/ve planted 1 trees//, the p【lan is to plan【】t more than 150 trees.【 That wil/l h【elp \to clean /up this area."The b\【irthplace of Be】atles is implementing several tail\ored strategi【es, /such as green routes, bio pollutant filters, 【pollinator gardens, and sust/aina】ble dra【inage\ systems to reduce the impact of flood risks.【"What we a】r】e looking to】 do is to put thes/e 】green】 interventions into the right place in the c】it【y; \we wi【ll be】 monit【ori\ng air qu【alit【y, water quality, biodivers【ity, looking \at wellbe/】ing/, people’s percep】tion of/ the \area, and /loo\king a】t some economi/c indic【ators as well," sa\ys Juliet Stapl】es, a s\enior pr【ojec【\t manager for URBAN \【Greenup 】at Liverpo\ol c【ity coun/cil.Once the whole set of nature-/based【 s【oluti【ons】 is 【v【alidated, it will be transf/erred to a\nother five cities; Mantov】a, Italy【; L【udw】igsburg, Ger/man【y\; Medellin, Colombi/a; Cheng/du, China; Binh Dinh, Vietnam and \replicated all over the world, to green up our more/ and more overcrowded urb【an areas.1212121212121212J/ourn\alist name/ • \Katy Dartf\ordShare this articleCopy/paste the artic/le video embe\d li】nk below:CopyShareTweetS\haresendSh/areTweetSharesend/MoreHideShareSen/dSh】areShareShareS【en\dShareShare】You might a】lso like 【 / Smart farming: how tec【\hno\logy is i】mproving animal welfare and efficiency in agriculture 【 \ \ / / 】\ 】 / Can d】rones help/ greek olive oil producers【】/? / / \ Captu】rin【g CO2: How to\ reduce ca/rbon d/ioxide/ 】emi】ssions 】from the ceme】nt indu】//stry / 】 】 More aboutEnvironmen\tal prote】c【tionEcologyScience【 \ Most vi】ewed \ / /【 】 Wha】t influence o\n climate/ i【/s /th\e cor【onavirus lo\ckdown rea\lly hav\i【ng? 【 【 】Th【e\ new AI system safeguarding pre\ma\/ture babies from/ 【infection\ 】 \ / Messenger RNA/: t\he molec/ul\e【 that may teach【 our b【od\ie\【s to beat cance/r / / Apple and Googl【e \say they'll work together t】o 【trace spread】 of coronavirus via sma】rtphones 】 How EU funding is chang】ing the fac】e of Lat/vian innovat/ion 【 【 】 Browse today�/39;s tags tonnes of pla/stic.The airports】&r/squo; operator, /Dubai Airports, banned all single use plastics from 【inside the terminal a】t 【t\he beginning of】 this year/.Th】at【 means that plastic cutle【ry, water bottle【s, dri【nking straw】s/, packaging and polythene bags are all banned from cafes and【 rest\aurants.Eugene Barry, D】ubai A\irp\orts’ executi【ve vi/c【e /president (commercia】l), told F/ocus: 】&ldqu】o;\Ni/nety f【i】ve per \cen【t of our partners have actua】lly made the pledge to switch from plastic to appropriate and re】levant substi\tutes for 【som/e of the pr/oducts that are used in catering and/ 】r【etail a【\cross the airport.”【The /operator hope】s it】's a strategy that m/ight become a\ t】em【plate for o\/t/her major transpo\rtation h】ubs and bus【inesses】.“Thi【s is ver】y much 】/the early stages of a long/ journey, I 【believe, t【o h\/ave a more e【nvi【ronmentally frie/ndly ap【proach /to managing bu【/【\sines】ses,&\rdquo; Barry said.\To see the a/mount of plastic that's building up in our s【and an【d in our oceans is jus\t cr】azy. Tom Arnel, Common\ Gro】unds founder】【 】 / \ Dubai&】rs/q】uo;s 700 h【otels are already【 look\in【g \【【at alternati【v\es, s/uch as switching\ water bottles from plastic to glass/.Plastic key cards could a/lso be a thing of /the /pa】st, as develop】ers /【l【ook i/nto switc\hing them to wood-b/ased materials.The eco packagin\g company Avani is one firm offering plast\ic-f/ree】 a/lte/rn】atives, including a bag 】made from cassa\va, 】a ch】eap and common 】root【 vegetable.The ma【terial is bio/【deg/radable a【nd compostable/, breaking down over a perio【d of month/s on land【 or】 at【 sea.Peter Avram, 【\man【】agin【】g director of Avani Middle East, sai/d: &/l】dqu/o;Until /a 【couple【 of years ago we had no 【major solutions, pa/rt/icularly for 】the bag.&】rdquo;Bu【t the cassava b】ag, a 】mixtu】r\e of starch, vegeta\bl/e oil /and organix r/\e】sins, has changed the equation.Avram】 said the 【product has helped re/duce t/he 】use of plastic bag\【s by mor\e than 50 per\ c\en】t.To【m Arnel, founder of the Comm【on /Grounds coffee c】hain, is on【e 【company ma】king 】the sw【itch【.“As a father of three kids, I take【 my family to t【he beach all the /ti/me 【and t/o see the 】amount of/】 \plasti\c th【at's building u/p in o】ur sand and in our ocea】ns i/s just crazy.&rdq】uo;His\ company has 】ph】\a】/sed out pl\a/stic c【ups and bowls.“We serve 【th【ousands【】 of 【cust/omers a week and every little bit【】 that we /can do really 【does go 【a long way 】to help the situ/at【ion. 】It's just\ 】about mak【ing sure that you do the work to\ understand where the single u\se pl/a/【stic is. All \of our plastic cups【, all/ of our takeaway 】bowls and p】lates and cutlery, you know, 】replenishing those 【a】reas of o\ur kit【chens with t】hings that we kne\w【 work great fo/r the environment.&rd【quo;Arnel s\aid the feedback 【f\ro/m customers had b【ee【n “amazin【g”.&ld】quo】;As l【ong as 】everyon\e's d】oi【n/g t】heir bit an【d understanding their/ impact, /we should 】be】 able to make a 】change togethe【r\.”Share 【t【his a】rticl/eCop/y/paste th\/e article video e/mbed link b/elo【w:C/opyShareTwee【tSharesendShar【eTweetSharesen【dMoreHideShareSend/ShareShareShareSendShar/eShareYou/ might als/o like 】 The appetite for l\ocal sustain】abl】e food【 p【ro/duce in the U/nited Arab 【Em/irates 【 【 \ \ 【 \ New era【 for B【enidorm as r\esort embraces sustainabili/ty 【 \ \ Health innovations - the 】young Europe【ans /dreaming up c//re\ative solutions for healthca】r\e 】 More 【aboutR【e】cycl】i】ngEnvironmental 【protectio】/nDub【ai /United Arab E/mirat\es】 Most viewe/d / 】 【 【 【 / 【 Beijing is their campus: Insid【e the Chines【e capital’s life-ch/anging stud/y tours \ \ / 9 places to visi】t on your【 cul/t】ural trip around】 Croatia // \ 【 \ \The Palm J\um\eirah: Du/bai�【39;s symbol of cre【ativity and ambiti/on 】 \/Market】s, coffee and stre】et【 /art: discove/ring Zagreb's secret delights 【】 】 【 】 \ \ \ Greek islands of his【tory and culture 【 】 \ \ \/ Br\owse today�】39;s 】t【agsDFjv

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MYkVO【n t\【h【is wee】k’s Smart】 Regio【ns, we take a pl/unge i/n the European U/nion’s】 longest r\iver: the Danube. Since ancient【 ti】mes, the riverbed has see\n m】any chan【ges but some of its inhab【itants are in d/\anger. The Europ【ean Cohes/ion Polic\y //is providing a push to protect \the ri】ve\r’s ecosy【stem.The Danube is the second lo\ngest river in 】【Eu\ro【pe. \Its path 】can be t】ra\ced from\ Germany t/o the Black Sea. L\oved by many, the D/anube’s critical ecosystems a/re now being】 prote【cte【d and/ preserv\ed. Georg Frank】 is\ a biologist and coo】rdi/nator\ at the DANUBEPARKS network, an organ【isati\on \that p\rotects are】as】 around【 the ten count/ries crossed by t】he/ river.&ldqu/】【o;We have 【more than 900 islan【ds 【a\long t/he Danube […] of wh【ich【 147 islands which are absolutely natural and, in the 】frame of\ t】his /wild isl\and 【initiative, w】/e try to protect】 】- in particular 】/- these //【wild island/s covering se/veral /10,000 hectares."The Danube Park\s network is wo\rking to pre】ser】ve the\ basin of the 2885km river: 5,】00】0 animal species/ 】and 2000【 plants live alo】ng its shores./ /It has a budge/【t of 3 million eu【ros,/ of \which 2.【6 m/illion euros is covered by the E】U/'s Coh】esion P/olic\y.T\【he DANU/BEPARKS rep】resen【tatives pay particular attention to, what they c/all, fla【gship spe\cies. By preserving their habitat, they also prote/ct th【【e animals or 【plants l【iving there./Twenty years of work/ h\ave shown prom【ising re/sults in the res【toration of nat【ural environments. Euronews spok【e to【 Attila Fer/sch (the deputy】】 d\ire/ctor of th/【\e Fertö/;-Hanság/ national 】/park) about the result/s.“7/0-75% in the/ Hungarian Dan】ube b】io】tops/, D【anube habi【【tats, which were【 involved in this pr【oject are i】n good status. Probab\ly the】 other 25% of\ the D/anub/】e habitats are no】t critical, but】】 we【 hav/e to work 【【together".1212121212121】2Share this /articleCopy/paste the article /【video 【embed link be\low:CopyShar\eTwe】etSharesen【d\ShareTwee【】【tSha\/resendM】oreHideShareSendSh【areShareShareSendSha\reShareMore aboutEnvironmental pro】tectionFaun/a and FloraAustria / Brow/s\e today's\ tagsUCIm

XG环保概念uQ

ARrGThe Eu/rop【ean Union 】h\as stepped i】n to help small /fi【】shing/ communities 】preserve/ their way of】 life, as y\oung people t\urn away from the job that their for】ebears 】d\id/ for generations.T【he Swedish-/speaking i【s】land commu/nity of Pellin/ki in southern Fi\nland is typical of those t/h【e EU 】is trying to hel/】p.For gen\erati】ons, fishing has been a respec/ted trade an】d a traditio/nal way of life for man/y famili/es. But today, t【he number of local fishers is dwindling. Only a few remain\.One r【e\ason is 】dec【l【/\ini【ng catch】es. The fishers blame an in】cr/easing number of 【predators: seals and cormorants \/】damage the c\age\s and dec】imat\e\ f\ish\/ 【stoc】ks.Good c\atches are no longer guaranteed, and t/\he\】 e】conomic surviv【【al of family-r】un fisheries is becoming increasing\ly uncer】tain.M\ost chil\dren from fi【shin\g families make 】a 】safer choice】 to/ leave/ home and study s【ometh【ing else.As their parents age and】 retire, small-sc/ale fisheries, once\ 【typical in Finland, \go ou【t /of busi/ness. Nationwide, the /numbe【【r of professional fishers ha】s decli\【ned in recent decades/ from 10 to aroun】d 400.【Twen】t/y-se\v】en-year-old Marie Kellgren has been fishing full-time fo/r m\or/e than four years, alt【hough she acknowl/edges that there are no】】t man\y like her."We&/rsquo;re \not m\any - young peop\le \fishing】. \I think 】it’s because it’s 【【physically hard wo【rk, and you don&rs【quo;t know for ho】w many years you c/an do \it. It's a bi【g risk to/ start."She in】itiall/y we【nt to stud】y t\ourism \in Helsink【i but then took up the op】por【tuni】ty of【 a local &ldq【uo;Master-【\【Apprentice" pr/og\ram to l【earn /t】he trade f\rom her /fat】her.\The】 EU-supported scheme provided a s\mall g】rant that allowed Marie to work for a year as an a/pprent】ice 】fisherwoman — without 】putting her fathe】r's business under any further fin】anci/a/l st【ra【in.My\ father 】is a fisherman, 【m\y father’s fat】her was 【a f【ish/erman, an【d my】 fathe】r's f【ather's father was\ a fisherman. /】 】 \ V】iking Kel\lgr/en 】 【 】 Her father, Viking, told Euronews: &ldq/uo;/】My fa\th【er is a fishe】rman, my 【father’s father w】as/\ a fi\sherman】, a\nd my father's f】at/h】er's \father was a\ fisherman. So M】arie/【 is the f【ifth gener】ation fishing here/."Th\e t\raining p/rogram included some th/eory an【d/ 】800 h】o】ur\s of fishing pra\ctice\."I lear】ned how to fish with nets and with trap\s, t/【o take care \of t】he fish, the catch, and to/ prepar\e, to 【salt a】nd to smoke and cold【-s】moke a\nd /make fishcake【s, and marke\tin【g, and all \o\ther st【uff about pay\ing 【b】\ills."The funding 【for the "Master-Ap【】p\rentice" pr\ogram wa【s pr\ovided main/ly by the Euro】pean Mar【itim【/e and Fishe】ri】es Fund, which supports generational rene/wal/】 in Europe's】 f/ishing sector. The idea came from \the local fishing comm\unity i\n Pellinki, when another aspir\ing fisherwoman, Tanja Åkerfelt, was struggling to enter the profess/ion."My fat/her didn&r【squo;t think th【at \was a 【go//od ide】a,” Tanja said. &ldq【uo;That&\rsquo;s when I had to 】talk to】 other fisher【m【en, won\de【r】in/g, how coul/d【 we do【 this.”O】ne /of the fishermen she【 sp/oke to was E】sko\ 】Taanila, who man】ages th/e pa/\rtnership /b【etw\een/ privat\e and public sto【ckhold】ers in】 the loc【al fisheries【【 se】ctor, kn【own as a FLAG &mdash】; Fis【heries Local Actio/n Group.Taanila came up with s/implified 】paperwork &mdash\; a formal【 contract and t/he 【tr\aining pr\og】ram\ for both the mas\t\er a/nd t【he\ appr\entice.Training a【 new 】fis【her costs around 6,000 e/ur/os. Esko says it's an ine【xpensive way to sustain【 professional fishing, which is the o】nly ye\ar-round econom】ic 【activity i/n the Pellinki are【a.T\h【e progr/am is helping to slo【\w the decli\ne of south\ern F/inland's fishing community — but/ it cannot reverse it.T【aanil\a 【said: &ldqu】o;Ever】y time 10 fis\hermen q【\uit, we get one or mos】tly two young peopl/e w\ho 】/are inte【re【sted in continuing."The progr【am has been running f【\or three years. Out of 15 app\rentices, 12 d【/ecided to \keep fishing professionally.That's a hi【gh succ【ess rat\e, but with the g/r】owing seal p】roblem and the fu】ture【 of fis/h s/to\cks uncer/tain,】 these/】 ef/for\ts might not be enough."We 】hav\e to get \new fisherme\n because/ the avera/ge age here is 60 years o/ld,&rdquo\; said Ta/an】il\a. &【ldquo;So if\ \we do nothing, 】it】 wi【ll】 //take only【 five or six years and everybody wil【l have quit. It is ve\ry important that\ we have a【 living fishery in【 ou/r coastal areas.】 Without tha/t,/ it c【ou\ld be a dead ar】ea. And that&\/rsquo;s not n【ic/e."Much furthe【r south, off the coast of the Belgian port of Ostend, the fishing 【tradition is thriving and u\【ndergoi/\ng/ a renewal.With its limite【】d coas\tline【 an/d only six d\oze【n\ fishing vessels, Belgium is\n't a big fi【\shing】 country /—】 but in coastal 【West Flanders/ province, f【ishing tradi】t/ionally played an importan【t role.A lo/cal maritime \scho\ol &ndash【; the Maritie【m\ Instituut Mercator – runs\】 a ded/icated training ship, \wh【ich was renovated with EU he\lp.Built\ in 1967/, the "Br【o\odwinner", /a beam tra/wler, was refi/tted to provide bett】er safety and a gr/eater level of comfort than on t\raditional】 ve\】ssels.Bart DeWae/gen\ar/e, \a teacher at/ t【he Maritiem】 Insti/tuut Mercat\or, said s】tudents get\ esse\ntia/l hands-【【on training. Most of th/em d\on't have the se【a in their blood."I 【think maybe 20 per】 ce\nt are from】 familie/s that did it bef】ore, and 80【 per cent don’t【 even know anything about it. The】\y come/ from big /cities lik【e Antwe/rp and 【B\russels, no\th】】i【ng to do\ with t【he s\ea.&rdq】uo;Stud【ent/s go on eight-hour f/ishing trip】s sta【rting \fro【m the age of 12. By\ 16, 】t】hey spend】 hal】f 】o】f th/eir school ti】m】e at sea.Along with var/ious f/ishing-related skills, they learn navigati/on and marine engineerin【g.Most are /seeking a job in the maritime\ sector,】 but not necessarily in the fis/hing industry, 】where the work is har/d and the/ risk of accidents high./Sami \Tebbouche\, a student, said: "Y】ou 】have to learn to sail the vessel on your own】. You have to wa【ke up at night to repair \t\he net/s. It's tough!"Another student, Seppe DeKinde】r, said the unpredictable n】ature of th】e job】 puts many young 【people off. Fishermen's salaries can be ver/【y high - or low, depe】nding on the catch."It&r【squo;s unp\redictable ho【w much】 you ca【/n earn\ sometimes. That&/rsqu\o;s why a lot 【of p】eople are uncerta【in i\f\ they rea/lly/ want to do it/】. And /also becau【se it’s really h】ard wo】rk. And a【 lot 【of p【eople \have k】i/d\s a/nd stuff, and they don&rsq/】uo;t want to【 leave them behind."\In the 1980s, five vo/cati\o\nal】 sch【ools【 】tr\ained 3【00 pupils a /year to wo】rk in fisheries. Today, only o\ne【 【sch】ool wit【h 40 students 【remains.Teache/rs say /that in the modern era, even high salar】ies and improved【 【/working conditions are n】ot enough to /ma【ke fishing attractive for【 yo【ung peopl】e.The scho【\o/l’s headmaster Jac【ki/e Scherrens said: "I\n th】e /p【ast, when they/ 】were, for example, two weeks at se】a, three days in the 】harbour, but from the th【ree da【/ys yo】u had 】to work】 two \days, and that was no problem. Now, when they a/【re, let&rsquo\;s say, /e/ight day】/s a】t sea, 【four days in /h】arbour, and/ you ha】ve to work one【 or two \days/ &m/d】【ash; they don\&\】rsquo;t wan【t that anymore! S/o it&rsquo\;s【 very difficult【 to attract you\n【g people for it."There /\are hopes th【at/\ si】x new vessels about to】 enter the Be/lgian fis】hing【 fleet will revive interest i\n the profession.1212121【】2121212121Shar\e this a【rticleCopy/pas\te the a/rticle video embed link below:CopyShareTw/eetS】【】】har】esendShareTweetShar】esendMoreHide【ShareSendShareShareShareSendSha】reSha\reYou/ might also l/ike 】 【 /\ The importance of re【sto】ring ma/rine【 b/iodiv】ersi】ty \ 【 M\o/re a【boutFishery/YouthOceanEnvironmental【 protection/ 】Most viewed /\ 【 \ / 【 What i【nfluence on climate is 】the coronavirus lockd\own rea\lly having? 】\/ 】 The new AI system safeguar\ding premature babies from infecti【on \ \ 】 / 】 Mes【sen\ger RNA: the molec\】ule that may teach our bodies to beat cancer 【 【 / 【 【 Apple and Google say t/hey'/;l\l work together /to t】ra/ce spread of //【c\or\onavirus via s】martphones How EU fundin\g is/ cha/nging \the face of Latvian innovation 】 【 【Brows】e today's【 tagso88O

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